Inventor Asks Children For Ideas For Inventions And Makes Them A Reality


Hey there,

«Each individual experiences the world from their own unique perspective» and «seeing things from a child’s point of view can change everything».
The famous British designer Dominic Wilcox took this into account when he asked children throughout the United Kingdom to think of invention ideas, and when these children’s inventions started coming in, Dominic decided to pick some of the best ones and actually get them manufactured. After they were made, he invited the children to come and explain their inventions.

Dominic explained that “instead of just putting the drawings on the fridge door as most adults do with a child’s drawings, why not push the ideas as far as they can go? Taking the power of children’s imaginations seriously and see where it leads to.”

Here they are a couple of those, some are pretty ingenious:

British designer asks children for ideas for an invention. Then he makes them reality !

Original Source

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Let’s navigate in Portugal again


Muito antes de Startups e o Web Summit em Lisboa serem fixes, “haja novamente navegadores em Portugal” 🙂

«Anda com tipos melhores do que tu, mais sonhadores, com mais força, porque vais crescer com eles, não te rodeies daquelas pessoas fáceis que só estão bem a assobiar e a querer mudar o mundo com opiniões. Não se muda o Mundo com assobios, não se muda o mundo com críticas fáceis ao trabalho dos outros, muda-se o mundo com acção, com trabalho.»

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

5 Essential Leadership Lessons Learned from Game of Thrones


Hey there everyone,
I haven’t made posts for a while, so, here we go again:

What are the best leadership lessons to learn from Game of Thrones?
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Mira Zaslove answers:

1.  “The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword. – Eddard Stark.
Don’t shy away from making tough calls. And just as importantly, do the unpleasant work to follow through. As Ned reminds us, “He who hides behind executioners soon forgets what death is.” Leaders who spend time in the trenches, doing the tough work, will take making tough decisions more seriously.

2.  “A Lannister always pays his debts.” – Tyrion Lannister
In the workplace, the quickest way to lose respect, and power, is to promise things you can’t deliver. The surest way to get people to do things for you today, is for them to trust, that you will do what you say you will, in the future. Leaders follow through on their word. When they say they are going to do something, they do it.

3.  “Any man who must say, I am the king, is no true king.” – Tywin Lannister
True power comes from where people believe it comes from. Not from where you say it comes from. The best leaders are followed based on the collective will, not because they say, “I am the boss.” Power and influence, often come from unexpected places.

4.  “Chaos isn’t a pit. Chaos is a ladder.” – Littlefinger
Chaotic times reveal a leader’s strength. When times are good, it’s easy to be the leader. Only when chaos reigns, do many leaders rise. Effective leaders aren’t thwarted by challenges. They use challenges to foist them higher. As Littefinger, highlights: “Many who try to climb fail and never get to try again. The fall breaks them.” Leaders are not broken. They continue to climb.

5.  “Winter is coming.” – House Stark
 Leaders remain vigilant. The world is uncertain. The best leaders always innovate, stay strong, and plan for the future. Being prepared for the unexpected is essential. Embrace winter, especially when everyone else is distracted and basking in the sun.

Original Source (Quora)
See also: Leadership Lessons from GoT (SlideShare)
Marketing Lessons from Game of Thrones


Best regards and…House Stark rules, always,
Pedro Calado

A Study Found WHY Teens Like Science, Not Science Class


It turns out liking science isn’t the same as liking science class.

New reports from sources that advocate for STEM education, found that while teenagers are interested in subjects like physics, biology, and engineering, they tend not to enjoy their in-school classes – based on an online survey of more than 1,500 teens from around the country.

This discrepancy means there’s room both in and out of school to dramatically improve STEM education offerings for teens, mostly by making them more hands-on and engaging.
Some 81 percent of teens said that they were interested in science. Seventy-three percent were interested in biology in particular. But only 37 percent of students said they enjoy their science class, and even fewer — 33 percent — liked biology class. That’s less than the 48 percent who said they enjoyed non-science classes.

The sample was balanced by region and ethnicity. Differences in outcomes by race, ethnicity, and income were tested for significance at the 95 percent confidence interval. All differences noted in the brief and infographic are statistically significant.

Explore the survey outcomes more fully (PowerPoint).

While many teens find more hands-on experiences like field trips and experiments to be most compelling, most instruction in science class involves either textbooks or in-class discussion. A chart compares preferred learning styles compared to teaching methods:

Most used / most liked

The survey also examined the relationship between students’ family income and access to and interest in STEM fields. Lower-income students were less likely to know an adult involved in biology and less likely to participate in a science club.

Overall, more than 80 percent of teens reported that they thought knowing adults in their desired field of work might help them advance, but just about a third actually knew adults in that field.

The authors of the AmGen and Change the Equation report argue that schools should adopt more inquiry-based STEM curricula and that teachers should receive training in how to teach it. They also argue for stronger ties between businesses and community members and schools.

STEM often makes news when students create or achieve remarkable things—consider thestudents at the White House Science Fair, who shared projects related to everything from pollution to artificial intelligence. The subjects are a priority for federal, state, and local policymakers, who often raise concerns about the dearth of of young people pursuing degrees and career in STEM. The Every Student Succeeds Act, the successor to No Child Left Behind, includes more flexibility for districts and states looking to create or support STEM programs. But this survey hints at the fact that in many schools, science education is still less-than-inspiring.

A few other findings from the report:

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Original Source (Education Week)

EU Wants All Scientific Papers to be Open Access by 2020


The European Union recently decided that enough was enough and will be granting open access to all European scientific papers to the public by 2020.

From a legal perspective, this mandate can only be enforced on publically funded research, but they are hoping that privately held research firms will soon follow suit. Scientific journals are ultimately not very happy about this decision, as the previous subscription-based models would effectively be eliminated. In the current state, scientific journals can also selectively release the content that they want to the media, given them control over the knowledge that gets spread publically.

This decision was the result of a meeting between the Competitiveness Council, which included leaders in the scientific and technological communities.  All parties were in agreement with the goal to make scientific papers open access, according to Futurism, and the goal is to have it completed by 2020.

Making all of this knowledge open access would mean that the entire world would have access to millions of papers and scientific research that usually only paid subscribers and other higher up members of the scientific community would have.

The deadline is actually a fairly close one, and the council has provided no information on how the progress will be overseen. Making sure that every paper is open to the public will require a lot of work and oversight, but plans are beginning to be formulated on how to accomplish this task. Hopefully, having open access to all of this research will allow generations to become more science literate and increase the overall state of knowledge and education.

Original source

Why Self-Education Or Homeschooling Is Becoming More Popular


“Drop out of school before your mind rots from exposure to our mediocre educational system. Forget about the Senior Prom and go to the library and educate yourself if you’ve got any guts. Some of you like Pep rallies and plastic robots who tell you what to read.” – Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa pointed that the standardized educational system often limits people’s imagination and will for learning. If you want to break the boundaries and surpass mediocrity, you may just have to get out of that system, and self-education is the way to do it. Here are the most important reasons to start investigating your own interests without any postponements:

Related CE Article: This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education

1. There Are No Grades

You will be the judge for your own accomplishments. There will be no standardized tests and subjective grades on papers that don’t awaken your interest. You will learn for the purpose of learning. When the pressure of a grade goes away, you will be amazed by your genuine motivation for self-development.

2. Self-Education Fulfills You

When you realize that you’re making real efforts to fulfill your own dreams, you’ll feel like a complete person. Have you noticed the enthusiasm in the eyes of people who are doing what they love? That’s what self-education does – it gives you inner satisfaction and certainty in all decisions you make.

3. No One Can Take Your Knowledge Away

Sometimes college and university professors are the greatest demotivators. They give you low grades on projects, even though you tried your best to meet their requirements and made sure to conduct an in-depth research. It’s like they are underestimating your efforts. When you are learning what you want to learn, you will be the only person in charge of the projects and lectures relevant to your interests.

4. You Will Discover New Opportunities

College does prepare you for a professional career. However, you can’t expect to get the job of your dreams just because you have a degree. Do you know what makes certain graduates more successful than others? Their practical skills and the knowledge they have gained outside the classroom. When you consider learning to be a lifetime activity, you’ll keep discovering new opportunities as you expand beyond the boundaries of traditional education.

5. There Are No Limits You Can’t Push

When you start investing time and effort in self-education, you’ll realize that there is no end to that journey. As soon as you discover the things you want to know, you’ll start wondering about something else, and that will raise other questions. That’s the whole beauty of learning without being limited by textbooks and a standardized system – you never stop wondering. Your perspective of impossible will shift and you’ll understand that the capacity of your mind is much greater than you ever imagined.

6. You’ll Adapt To The Ever-changing World

In other words, you’ll always stay relevant. Your current skills and knowledge can easily become obsolete when the next generations graduate. Thus, success in any profession is intertwined with self-development. Make sure to learn new techniques and skills if you want to make progress in your career.

7. Self-Education Makes You A More Interesting Person

There are two types of people in a conversation: those who have nothing to say and those who can always think of fun facts that amuse everyone around. Which one are you going to be? The more information you know and the more areas you explore – the more interesting you become. Don’t stop seeking out new challenges; they will add more depth and appeal to your character.

 

Original source (Collective Evolution)

Online Learning: Why Libraries Could Be the Key to MOOCs’ Success


Some studies found that about five percent of those enrolled in massive open online courses (known as MOOCs) completed the course. And those who took the courses tended to be more educated already – 70 percent of survey respondents had bachelors degrees and 39 percent identified as teachers or former teachers. Online courses can be a helpful tool for self-sufficient, highly motivated learners with reliable computers and internet at home, but others may need a little more support. For those who haven’t found success using free online courses, Learning Circles might be an answer.

Learning Circles add a social element to what is otherwise a solitary learning experience by bringing people together in person to take an online course together over six to eight weeks, with the help of a facilitator. Librarians at Chicago Public Library (CPL) partnered with the nonprofit Peer 2 Peer University (P2PU) to make online education more accessible through this program.

Libraries are a perfect setting for Learning Circles for several reasons: they already serve the local community; they are equipped with meeting spaces; many have computer stations, and most importantly, librarians know how to help people find answers.

“Most people take online classes in solitude and that’s when you put on the headphones,” said James Teng, a CPL librarian at who facilitated a course on public speaking. “Sometimes you feel alone. Learning Circles bring people together to work together and develop teamwork.”

Learning Circles aren’t for everyone; some people prefer a more traditional lecture or feel more comfortable having a content expert who has all the answers. But Learning Circles give participants a community, which does a lot to help with motivation. Librarians said it was important to set expectations at the outset, so they developed a Learning Circles contract.

“You come up with this contract: no cell phones, you’ll pay attention, be respectful of your fellow learners,” said Edson “so it gives them a sense of accountability in that first week. How serious they take it, it depends, but I feel like setting some ground rules in the first week is helpful.”

“Public libraries are often referred to as the people’s university,” said Mark Anderson, director of Learning and Economic Advancement of CPL, at the SXSWEDU conference. Library patrons traditionally come in, find resources, and are left on their own to learn the material. But with the P2PU partnership, funded by a Knight Foundation News Challenge on Libraries grant, Anderson said librarians were able to take a more active role in facilitating learning.

“The idea of working and creating these Learning Circles really helped us move closer to that ideal of being the people’s university to help people progress, with some facilitation on our part,” Anderson said.

Original source – Mind/Shift

Creative Advertising Campaign – Hermit Crab


The Creative Advertising Campaign #‎ADFEST2016 Grand Lotus winner for Outdoor and Direct, ‘Shell we move?’ by Hakuhodo Kettle Inc. Tokyo used the most unlikely ambassadors for the real estate company, SUUMO.

Suumo Japan in partnership with the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology have come up with an innovative solution to the loss of sea shells on the beaches of Okinawa Japan, by creating Suumo branded artificial shell for hermit crabs.

To fully understand the brilliance of this project you need to know that Suumo is a Japanese website for people looking to rent or buy homes and apartments. Hermit crabs are the ‘masters of living’, the video says, and ‘they keep seeking out the perfect home throughout their entire lives’. To satisfy a hermit crab in selecting the perfect home, well that’s what Suumo has set out to do.

Together Suumo and students of the Tokyo University Marine Science and Oceanography departments, created the ‘Shell We Move’ project. The “home” is not a shell-shape, but “cocoon shape” which combines toughness and lightness. Its interior is made wider than usual shells so that it does not hurt hermit crabs’ delicate body, and the artificial shells are environmentally friendly as they are built from a mix of starches.

Original source

How We Can Reprogram Life Wisely



For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. “This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on,” Enriquez says. “This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had.”