LinkedIn: The Differences Between Data Scientists, Data Engineers and Software Engineers

data science

Hey there, today I’m sharing a post from Data Science 101 guest author  entitled Data Scientists, Data Engineers, Software Engineers: The Difference According to LinkedIn.

Here’s his diagram that shows the skills breakdown between the 3 roles:

Ryan states that these roles are still evolving, and nowadays it’s much easier overall to enter the market, «as new tools (like Stitch) make it easy for software developers to set up and maintain data pipelines. Larger companies are pulling data engineers off the software engineering team entirely in lieu of forming a centralized data team where infrastructure and analysis sit together. In some scenarios data scientists are responsible for both data consolidation and analysis».

The author also says that «there is no single dominant path. But we expect this rapid evolution to continue, after all, data certainly isn’t getting any smaller».

Best regards and stay awesome,
Pedro Calado

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Is Data Science Really Science?

data science

Hey there awesome people, after attending 2 unforgettable days of Web Summit Lisbon 2016 and a few months of inactivity due to educational/personal reasons (such as getting my masters degree on track) I’m back to WordPress again, this time with full strength, jabbing and boxing for a right hook knockout everyday as Gary Vaynerchuk writes in his 3rd book and his daily vlog.

Today I’m sharing a very interesting article I read on LinkedIn this morning entitled “Is Data Science Really Science?” wrote by Bill Schmarzo.

The article called my attention right away, not only because I’m an aspiring Data scientist, but also because data (big and small), information and knowledge mining/management is the “new oil” – maybe even the oxygen – to the second half of 21st century successful organizations (startups, tech related or not).

Stay awesome.
Best regards, Pedro Calado

Let’s navigate in Portugal again


Muito antes de Startups e o Web Summit em Lisboa serem fixes, “haja novamente navegadores em Portugal” 🙂

«Anda com tipos melhores do que tu, mais sonhadores, com mais força, porque vais crescer com eles, não te rodeies daquelas pessoas fáceis que só estão bem a assobiar e a querer mudar o mundo com opiniões. Não se muda o Mundo com assobios, não se muda o mundo com críticas fáceis ao trabalho dos outros, muda-se o mundo com acção, com trabalho.»

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

5 Essential Leadership Lessons Learned from Game of Thrones


Hey there everyone,
I haven’t made posts for a while, so, here we go again:

What are the best leadership lessons to learn from Game of Thrones?
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Mira Zaslove answers:

1.  “The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword. – Eddard Stark.
Don’t shy away from making tough calls. And just as importantly, do the unpleasant work to follow through. As Ned reminds us, “He who hides behind executioners soon forgets what death is.” Leaders who spend time in the trenches, doing the tough work, will take making tough decisions more seriously.

2.  “A Lannister always pays his debts.” – Tyrion Lannister
In the workplace, the quickest way to lose respect, and power, is to promise things you can’t deliver. The surest way to get people to do things for you today, is for them to trust, that you will do what you say you will, in the future. Leaders follow through on their word. When they say they are going to do something, they do it.

3.  “Any man who must say, I am the king, is no true king.” – Tywin Lannister
True power comes from where people believe it comes from. Not from where you say it comes from. The best leaders are followed based on the collective will, not because they say, “I am the boss.” Power and influence, often come from unexpected places.

4.  “Chaos isn’t a pit. Chaos is a ladder.” – Littlefinger
Chaotic times reveal a leader’s strength. When times are good, it’s easy to be the leader. Only when chaos reigns, do many leaders rise. Effective leaders aren’t thwarted by challenges. They use challenges to foist them higher. As Littefinger, highlights: “Many who try to climb fail and never get to try again. The fall breaks them.” Leaders are not broken. They continue to climb.

5.  “Winter is coming.” – House Stark
 Leaders remain vigilant. The world is uncertain. The best leaders always innovate, stay strong, and plan for the future. Being prepared for the unexpected is essential. Embrace winter, especially when everyone else is distracted and basking in the sun.

Original Source (Quora)
See also: Leadership Lessons from GoT (SlideShare)
Marketing Lessons from Game of Thrones


Best regards and…House Stark rules, always,
Pedro Calado

Not A Data Scientist? You Can Still Be Data Savvy


Christian Bonilla says he has been amused for a while by the tone of articles he’s read that marvel at the rise of the data scientist role, while not every article went so far as to declare that data scientists would have the “sexiest job of the 21st Century” as Harvard Business Review did, most of the posts seen lately echoed the we-have-seen-the-future tone.
Christian doesn’t think they’re necessarily wrong (although this short Fortune article is a good reminder that the laws of supply and demand apply to data scientists too) but he doesn’t see what is surprising or a new about this trend. If The Onion were covering this story, he’d expect a headline like: “New study reveals that people who are good at math and programming are employed, affluent.”

Where’s the news here? People with math and programming chops have been getting rich on Wall Street since the seventies. As more companies generate big data, the need for these skills has expanded to new industries, to say nothing of the demand for these skills in the tech sector, but it’s all part of a long-term upward trend of the value of quantitative skills.

At many companies, the mandate of the “customer insights” team is to serve as a shared resource for other departments when they need someone who can understand the damn data and answer their questions. And why is this?

The systems companies have in place are partly to blame. Many enterprises, particularly ones that grew by acquisition and inherited multiple IT departments as a result, store their data in systems that are difficult for non-technical employees to use. That alone discourages the vast majority of people from ever touching their company’s raw data. But the larger obstacle is simply that even if decent tools are available, it takes know-how and patience most people don’t have to analyze data that’s in a relational database as opposed to in a dashboard or an Excel file. It’s not just learning SQL, either. Understanding a company’s data model and how it stores data well enough that you can query it accurately takes patience and a lot of trial and error. There’s a big difference between the data you work with in business school and what you often see in the real world in terms of data reliability and quality. This is why the vast majority of people rely on aggregated reports and cleansed data they get from their IT departments; they can trust the data without thinking twice about it.

The problem with relying on dashboards and pre-built reports to do your analysis is that it’s hard to do work that sets you apart when you’re looking at the same small sliver of the facts as everyone else.

Data quality is important, and companies emphasize having a single version of the truth for good reason, but it can seriously constrain your creativity. That’s the kind of analysis that makes your boss lean in and listen to what you’re saying. Being able to do it on your own is ten times better than having to ask someone else to do it for you.

Best of all, you don’t need more than junior-high math to answer that question. All you need is an inquisitive mind and the right data.

Christian Borilla: It’s said that smart people ask hard questions while really smart people ask simple ones. Indeed, many of the most important questions you can ask about your company are the simplest. Why do people choose our products over our competitors’? Why do customers leave us when they do? Should we offer discounts to boost sales? When you’re up to your neck in being a good do-er it’s easy to lose sight of these fundamental questions because people don’t ask you to answer them when you’re still green. But oh, the liberation when you can! This is how you can begin to understand and contribute to solving some of themost important challenges facing your business today.

Learning SQL and how to interrogate a company’s raw operations data to answer fundamental questions about its business was probably the most useful business skill I acquired in the early years of my career. As it turned out, I was a natural at asking good questions and just needed the tools to be able to answer them. But more than that, a marvelous thing happens inside the business person’s mind as a result of analyzing a business through its internal databases: the discipline of querying databases teaches you to ask better questions. More specifically, it teaches you how to structure big questions in such a way that they can actually be answered with precision. It forces you to clean up lazy thinking, because computers don’t allow vague questions. It teaches you to think in sets, an incredibly valuable mindset, without even realizing it. In short, it makes you a better business person by allowing you to more fully capitalize on your domain expertise. I know it changed my career tremendously for the better.

Original Source (Smart Like How)

Data Visualization Drives the Era of Information Activism


As the world of data is experiencing a seismic shift in 2016, spearheaded by a generation of passionate and tech savvy individuals, many of whom are part of the Millennial generation, having grown up with the web, millennials are used to having access to all the information they want with just a simple finger tap on a screen.
As millennials enter the workforce, they are bringing these expectations into the office, behaving less as data consumers and much more as information activists. These workers expect to be able to use data actively to express their views and individuality.

As data visualization tools are often free to download and user-friendly, more and more people are able to create self-service visualizations, allowing them to express their interests and discoveries through graphs and charts. This generation of data activists is creating visual representations to tell its stories with widely available data from a variety of sources, from sports scores to music charts at home to big and small data at work. Data, increasingly, is becoming a form of self-expression, both personally and within the enterprise.

The information activism trend draws parallels to the printed word. From the invention of the Gutenberg printing press until the advent of the Internet, the ability to write and publish information was a highly technical skill, in the hands of a select few individuals. The arrival of blogging made the written word a mass activity, open to all. Similarly, people are now eager to express themselves using data visualization to tell engaging and visually stimulating stories without the need for a graphic artist or cartographer. They can just do it for themselves.

By taking hold of and analyzing the “data of me,” information activists are altering how they view and understand their own heath, and often taking action to change unhealthy habits. The widespread adoption of this behavior has the potential to change every facet of healthcare, from individual well-being to insurance practices. This marriage of data visualization and information activism is being fueled by data from wearable sensor technology. As we have seen the widespread adoption of FitBits, Apple Watches, and other devices, the average data consumer is increasingly acting on personal health data from these devices. Information activists are even banding together in virtual communities of likeminded people to share, learn from and, ultimately, act on the insights from their joint data to achieve citizen-driven data insights and implement change.

See more at the original source:
Data Visualization Drives the Era of Information Activism (Data Informed)

Online Learning: Why Libraries Could Be the Key to MOOCs’ Success


Some studies found that about five percent of those enrolled in massive open online courses (known as MOOCs) completed the course. And those who took the courses tended to be more educated already – 70 percent of survey respondents had bachelors degrees and 39 percent identified as teachers or former teachers. Online courses can be a helpful tool for self-sufficient, highly motivated learners with reliable computers and internet at home, but others may need a little more support. For those who haven’t found success using free online courses, Learning Circles might be an answer.

Learning Circles add a social element to what is otherwise a solitary learning experience by bringing people together in person to take an online course together over six to eight weeks, with the help of a facilitator. Librarians at Chicago Public Library (CPL) partnered with the nonprofit Peer 2 Peer University (P2PU) to make online education more accessible through this program.

Libraries are a perfect setting for Learning Circles for several reasons: they already serve the local community; they are equipped with meeting spaces; many have computer stations, and most importantly, librarians know how to help people find answers.

“Most people take online classes in solitude and that’s when you put on the headphones,” said James Teng, a CPL librarian at who facilitated a course on public speaking. “Sometimes you feel alone. Learning Circles bring people together to work together and develop teamwork.”

Learning Circles aren’t for everyone; some people prefer a more traditional lecture or feel more comfortable having a content expert who has all the answers. But Learning Circles give participants a community, which does a lot to help with motivation. Librarians said it was important to set expectations at the outset, so they developed a Learning Circles contract.

“You come up with this contract: no cell phones, you’ll pay attention, be respectful of your fellow learners,” said Edson “so it gives them a sense of accountability in that first week. How serious they take it, it depends, but I feel like setting some ground rules in the first week is helpful.”

“Public libraries are often referred to as the people’s university,” said Mark Anderson, director of Learning and Economic Advancement of CPL, at the SXSWEDU conference. Library patrons traditionally come in, find resources, and are left on their own to learn the material. But with the P2PU partnership, funded by a Knight Foundation News Challenge on Libraries grant, Anderson said librarians were able to take a more active role in facilitating learning.

“The idea of working and creating these Learning Circles really helped us move closer to that ideal of being the people’s university to help people progress, with some facilitation on our part,” Anderson said.

Original source – Mind/Shift

How We Can Reprogram Life Wisely



For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. “This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on,” Enriquez says. “This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had.”

How Fast Is Digital Publisher Revenue Growing? Not As Fast As You Think


The recent struggles of online publishing are widely discussed. Despite many success stories and significant growth, the outlook in the media world seems to be doom and gloom, with plateauing audiences and scarce revenue. I too am on the record saying that the macroeconomics are unfavorable for text-based digital media seeking venture-capital-style scale. On the…

via How Fast Is Digital Publisher Revenue Growing? Not As Fast As You Think — Thought Catalog

Forgettable Technology: 4 Qualities of Really Great IT — Technopreneurph


We talk about you, you know. Once a month we get the entire service team together and we chat about what sorts of issues we’re resolving and how we can help you better. We don’t just strive to get great scores on our IT support surveys (which is a bonus, because our satisfaction rates are … Continue reading Forgettable Technology: 4 Qualities of Really Great IT| By |Justin Hayman

via Forgettable Technology: 4 Qualities of Really Great IT| By |Justin Hayman — Technopreneurph