Visual Attraction: How to Captivate Your Visitors’ Attention


Original Source – Search Engine Journal

Being interested in psychology, especially when applied to the web, is more than just reading Cialdini’s Influence. Don’t get me wrong by the way, that book is awesome. But there are just so much more psychological processes at work than people are probably aware of.

One of the most important ones, to my mind, is visual attention. People undoubtedly understand that attention is of importance when it comes to doing, well, anything really. So the same goes for visiting websites. But in my opinion it is not just attention, but visual attention that’s most important for visiting websites.


This Is Who/What Facebook Thinks You Are/Like


Last quarter, Facebook made $2.8 billion off our personal information. Starting this summer, the social network is letting us see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers.

Learn how, find out why you’ve been targeted and check what else Facebook thinks you like

Facebook has spent years mining from your online activity, against which it sells hyper-targeted advertising. If you are one of Facebook’s 204 million users in the United States and Canada, the social network made about $5.79 in advertising revenue off you last quarter.

On some level, we all know that Facebook does this, and on some level we all accept it. But starting this summer, Facebook is letting us lift the curtain and see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers. If you hover over the top, right-hand corner of any Facebook ad, you can access a dropdown menu that will let you hide certain ads, rate ads as helpful, or — this is the interesting part — see why a particular advertiser chose to target you.
Among the potential reasons: your age, your gender, your location, pages you’ve liked, pages your friends have liked, your propensity to click on similar ads, where you shop online, what kind of phone you have, your inferred hobbies … or “other reasons”.TIME

See also:

Original Source – TIME

The Pain of Sports & Football Fans


Does a sports fan really suffers with its team?

For The Sun newspaper, it does, because of the love that people bear their clubs, despair felt anywhere and anytime by fans with the defeats/goosebumps or just bad luck, at least in their new campaign.

The advertising film of The Sun newspaper, “We Feel Football” shows the passion of the fans, who may have ups and downs, at a time when we approach the start of the Premier League.

The campaign, created by advertising agency Grey London, is narrated to the music “Love Hurts” by the Scottish rock band Nazareth.


Source #1

Original Source

Apple’s Motivation…and probably one of the best Marketing Advice ever made, by Steve Jobs


As my second post on my WordPress I’m going to share a video that I’ve re-watched very recently, as I am attending a summer course about “Digital Marketing: Strategies and Tactics” at my college (Universidade Nova de Lisboa – Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas).

This video is a clip of one of the excellent presentations on the year of 1997 – in his sandals, shorts, and turtleneck – discussing how that chance to make a memory presents the fundamental question of branding, and that a brand is not so much about rational arguments, but the way that the company resonates with people emotionally.

More relevant in today’s world than when Jobs gave this piece of brilliance: Marketing is about values.

 

Jobs uses Nike as a case study:

Nike sells a commodity, they sell shoes. And yet when you think of Nike you feel something different than a shoe company. In their ads, as you know, they don’t ever talk about the product, they don’t ever talk about their air soles, how they’re better than Reebok’s air soles. What’s Nike do in their advertising? They honor great athletes and they honor great athletics. That is what they are about.

Branding answers the question of what are we here to do?, he says.

The ad, Jobs says, features living and dead heroes who were crazy enough to think they could change the world, who, as we know by now, decided to think different.

“The ones who aren’t (alive), you know, if they ever would have used a computer, it would have been a Mac”. As Jobs says: “Marketing is about values.” So we need to know ours.

Thanks for reading, I hope you’ve liked it and found it interesting.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado