Big Data: The New Natural Resource


BusinessWorld

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest. Destroyers of our attention span or innovations that make us smarter and closer? We’re still trying to understand how today’s technologies—which many can’t seem to live without—are transforming us.

Still, there is one change they’ve brought about that’s indisputably positive, one that most people intuitively get.And it’s this: if we live in an information age, then the flip side is we’re all information analysts.

Cloud computing, mobile and social computing are all changing how we communicate. Our strategy for big data and analytics has some core tenants, which provide a common experience. The combination of cloud, social, mobile and big data and analytics provides the user with a role-specific experience that is easy-to-use and customizable. The cloud enables organizations to start small, grow rapidly and scale massively.

Why Big Data Is The New Natural Resource.

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What The Best Education Systems Are Doing Right


ideas.ted.com

In South Korea and Finland, it’s not about finding the “right” school.

Fifty years ago, both South Korea and Finland had terrible education systems. Finland was at risk of becoming the economic stepchild of Europe. South Korea was ravaged by civil war. Yet over the past half century, both South Korea and Finland have turned their schools around — and now both countries are hailed internationally for their extremely high educational outcomes. What can other countries learn from these two successful, but diametrically opposed, educational models? Here’s an overview of what South Korea and Finland are doing right.

The Korean model: Grit and hard, hard, hard work.

For millennia, in some parts of Asia, the only way to climb the socioeconomic ladder and find secure work was to take an examination — in which the proctor was a proxy for the emperor, says Marc Tucker, president and CEO of the National Center on…

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The Plasticity of Networks


Technopreneurph

A good friend and business colleague once regaled me with his definition of a good corporate lawyer: “A good lawyer never says ‘no’; she says ‘here’s how’.” I thought this was an interesting and telling description – not because it conjured up creative interpretations of the law and loop-hole sleuthing corporate counsels – but that it imagined a seasoned practioner who understood the plasticity of her infrastructure (in this case the law) and the end goals of her client and therefore would often find innovative solutions that yielded business advantage. Plasticity in this context means that a seemingly rigid structure, like the law, can be deformed to meet a new need. Examples of this range from the mundane structuring of contracts to limit the downside of risky deals to the industry redefining methods of companies like Uber that challenge conventional practices and laws.

The law and the network – both…

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