Big Data: The New Natural Resource


BusinessWorld

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest. Destroyers of our attention span or innovations that make us smarter and closer? We’re still trying to understand how today’s technologies—which many can’t seem to live without—are transforming us.

Still, there is one change they’ve brought about that’s indisputably positive, one that most people intuitively get.And it’s this: if we live in an information age, then the flip side is we’re all information analysts.

Cloud computing, mobile and social computing are all changing how we communicate. Our strategy for big data and analytics has some core tenants, which provide a common experience. The combination of cloud, social, mobile and big data and analytics provides the user with a role-specific experience that is easy-to-use and customizable. The cloud enables organizations to start small, grow rapidly and scale massively.

Why Big Data Is The New Natural Resource.

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Big Data Explained in Less Than 2 Minutes – To Absolutely Anyone


See also: The Quantified Workplace: Big Data or Big Brother?

There are some things that are so big that they have implications for everyone, whether we want them to or not. Big Data is one of those concepts, and is completely transforming the way we do business and is impacting most other parts of our lives.

It’s such an important idea that everyone from your grandma to your CEO needs to have a basic understanding of what it is and why it’s important.

Original Source – LinkedIn

Microsoft Buys Data Science Specialist Revolution Analytics


Gigaom

Microsoft has agreed to acquire Revolution Analytics, a company built around commercial software and support for the popular R statistical computing project. The open source R project is hugely popular among data scientists and research types, and having Revolution’s R experts in-house could be a big deal for Microsoft as it tries to establish itself as the go-to place for data science software.

Among Revolution’s additions to the standard R capabilities were simplifying the use of the program and engineering it to run across big data systems such as Hadoop. Here’s how Joseph Sirosh, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for machine learning, explains what the deal means in a blog post:

As their volumes of data continually grow, organizations of all kinds around the world – financial, manufacturing, health care, retail, research – need powerful analytical models to make data-driven decisions. This requires high performance computation that is “close”…

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Big Data and Statisticians, Revisited (Video)


What's The Big Data?

Data Science, Big Data and Statistics – can we all live together? from Chalmers Internal on Vimeo.

Terry Speed on how (and a bit on why) statisticians have been left out of the big data movement. Best slide comes at 34:20 and I wish Speed have talked more about how his “personal statistical paradigm” contrasts with the ideology of big data.

“This is the Golden Age of statistics–but not necessarily for statisticians”–Gerry Hahn

“Those who ignore statistics are condemned to re-invent it”–Brad Efron

HT: Nathan Yau

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It’s Time for Storage to Smarten Up Already


Gigaom

DataGravity, the thus-far secretive startup co-founded by Paula Long of EqualLogic fame, is finally ready to talk about its DataGravity Discovery storage array.

Lately, much of the discussion around storage has been about speeds and feeds of the latest flash arrays — and that’s valid. But Long’s position is that much of the value of what companies store is lost because that data goes into a black box, and companies have to deploy audit software and other extras it to wring important information out of it. [company]DataGravity[/company] integrates those tools, search and analytics, into its software.

Aggregating data about the data

What are some examples of that important information? For instance: Who at the company accessed a file and how often? Who is working together on shared files? Is there personally identifiable information (PII) or credit card information sitting in documents? Which files have not been touched in two years? All of that…

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