Big Data: The New Natural Resource


BusinessWorld

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest. Destroyers of our attention span or innovations that make us smarter and closer? We’re still trying to understand how today’s technologies—which many can’t seem to live without—are transforming us.

Still, there is one change they’ve brought about that’s indisputably positive, one that most people intuitively get.And it’s this: if we live in an information age, then the flip side is we’re all information analysts.

Cloud computing, mobile and social computing are all changing how we communicate. Our strategy for big data and analytics has some core tenants, which provide a common experience. The combination of cloud, social, mobile and big data and analytics provides the user with a role-specific experience that is easy-to-use and customizable. The cloud enables organizations to start small, grow rapidly and scale massively.

Why Big Data Is The New Natural Resource.

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How Humans Spend Their Time Has Changed


Technopreneurph

How Humans Spend Their Time Has Changed image Hours of Work Per Week

Over the last 150 years, how humans spend their time has changed quite drastically.  As the chart above shows, the amount of time humans spend working has been on a steady decline over the last century and a half.  by In most countries, the typical work week has dropped by approximately 30 hours over the last 150 years.

On average, humans live 75 years.  That?s about 3,900 weeks. Or 27,000 days. Or 648,000 hours. We spend about a third of that time sleeping, and that number hasn?t changed over the last century.  What has changed drastically is how we spend our time when we are awake.

There are 168 hours in a week and we spend 56 hours of the week sleeping.  This leaves 112 hours for everything else.  If you go back 150 years, humans spent 70 hours of the 112 working.  However, how humans spend their time has…

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Why You Read 1000 Things About Change and Never Change


TIME

Knowing isn’t doing.

I post a lot of stuff about getting better at things. A common response to my posts is “I know that.”

Knowing is great for watching Jeopardy. It’s not nearly as good for life.

So why is learning about improvement so easy and actually improving so damn hard?

Most any change that requires a lot of consistent mental effort is going to fail because you spend most of the day on autopilot.

Via Charles Duhigg’s excellent book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business:

One paper published by a Duke University researcher in 2006 found that more than 40 percent of the actions people performed each day weren’t actual decisions, but habits.

Any change has to work when you’re on autopilot. The importance of self-control is one of the biggest myths about improvement.

Almost all the techniques for change…

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The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Center for Advanced Hindsight

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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Disruptive Technology Is Changing How Kids Learn


TIME

In a few weeks, the halls of a school in Nanuet, N.Y., will teem with mini race cars. The vehicles will sport custom-designed wheels, each set carefully tuned in diameter and thickness to achieve maximum speed.

But the cars’ makers aren’t college-level engineers; they’re middle-school students attempting to learn about physics and technology by using a device that combines both–the school’s 3-D printer. “It’s rewriting what’s possible” in education, says Vinny Garrison, the teacher who organizes the races.

It’s not the only innovation doing so. Nearly three-fourths of U.S. teachers use technology to motivate students to learn, according to a survey by PBS LearningMedia. And that tech is getting smarter: students can now virtually tour ancient worlds to learn history, take quizzes via smartphone and more.

Most of the changes are designed to better prepare U.S. students for careers in fast-growing fields like science and engineering. But they can come…

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The Plasticity of Networks


Technopreneurph

A good friend and business colleague once regaled me with his definition of a good corporate lawyer: “A good lawyer never says ‘no’; she says ‘here’s how’.” I thought this was an interesting and telling description – not because it conjured up creative interpretations of the law and loop-hole sleuthing corporate counsels – but that it imagined a seasoned practioner who understood the plasticity of her infrastructure (in this case the law) and the end goals of her client and therefore would often find innovative solutions that yielded business advantage. Plasticity in this context means that a seemingly rigid structure, like the law, can be deformed to meet a new need. Examples of this range from the mundane structuring of contracts to limit the downside of risky deals to the industry redefining methods of companies like Uber that challenge conventional practices and laws.

The law and the network – both…

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5 Workout Moves That Will Change Your Body


TIME

Functional training gives you the kind of strength that matters at the end of the day. This type of training will give you power in your daily life for practical movements like hauling your cooler to the beach, moving furniture, or carrying a toddler. So instead of measuring your strength by how much weight you can bench press (or curl, or squat), get fit where it counts by doing exercises that stem from natural, everyday movements like bending, pushing, and twisting.

Try this 5-move functional workout to feel the power, fast!

  1. T Push-up

Start in push-up position with your hands directly beneath your shoulders. Lower into a push-up, and as you return to starting position, rotate your torso to the left raising your left arm up into the air so that you are in a T position. You will need to engage your core, and balance on your right hand…

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5 Skills of Power and How You Can Learn to Use Them


ideas.ted.com

Eric Liu is on a mission to make civics “as sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.” As he describes in today’s TED Talk (watch: Why ordinary people need to understand power), we are at a moment of crisis in the United States. The average person simply doesn’t know how to participate in local government, and this means that clout is disproportionately concentrated in the hands of the few who do. Liu’s solution to this imbalance? That we teach everyone the basic skills of power.

As the people of Ferguson, Missouri, stand up against police brutality, the topic of how to take back civic power is on many minds. Through Citizen University, Liu is creating a shared curriculum of power that will be available soon. In the meantime, he offers up several basic skills it will include, to help anyone interested in influencing change right now.

Skill #1: Understand the system.

“Before you…

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