Startup Quantifies Video Content With Code


Gigaom

Computer vision has seen some major advances over the past couple of years, and a New York-based startup called Dextro wants to take the field to a new level by making it easier to quantify what the computers are seeing. Founded in 2012 by a pair of Ivy League graduates, the company is building an object-recognition platform that it says excels on busy images and lets users query their videos using an API a la other unstructured datasets.

The idea behind Dextro, according to co-founder David Luan, is to evolve computer vision services beyond tagging and into something more useful. He characterizes the difference between Dextro and most other computer vision startups (MetaMind, AlchemyAPI and Clarifai, for example) in terms of categorization versus statistics. Tagging photos automatically is great for image search and bringing order to stockpiles of unlabeled pictures, “but we found that most of the value and most of the…

View original post 529 more words

How Much Money Do Coders Make?


Gigaom

iOS rules the roost and beats Android, Bay Area coders get paid the most, and Node.js developers are up and coming: This sums up three findings from an analysis I performed on salary survey data collected from thousands of techies around the country by Payscale.com.

We pulled in data for a number of major cities on coding salaries, as well as national salaries based on the top seven job descriptions associated with a software language. The languages we covered included iOS, Android, Node.js, Java, Python, .Net and JavaScript. We picked those languages to cover a broad cross-section of IT that focused on ascendant and very popular languages.

Apple vs. Google

Despite the release of Apple’s new Swift coding language, which reduced the difficulty in coding iOS applications, job listings naming iOS requirements were the highest paid positions among the tech jobs covered. The highest mean salary among all the job…

View original post 374 more words

Belgian Superstar Stromae Decodes The Visions Behind His Biggest and Eccentric Music Videos


TIME

What does it take to become one of Europe’s most sought-after artists? Perhaps a mega-single that topped the charts in more than 20 countries. And if that’s not enough, two number one albums, countless awards, a successful clothing line, viral YouTube videos, and a sold out U.S. tour might do the trick.

But Belgian singer and composer Stromae’s international success lies not just in his ability to write clever lyrics and produce catchy beats – his allure also rests on the utter strength of his music videos.

Stromae’s video offerings are laced with metaphors and treated with deep – and sometimes even uncomfortable – imagery. Take, for example, last year’s “Papaoutai,” a song about sons growing up to be just like their fathers. Stromae plays a father whose son wants to interact and do things that fathers and sons do. But Stromae’s character doesn’t move; he’s static…

View original post 70 more words

Facebook Is Testing Snapchat Features


Facebook with Snapchat features. FaceSnap?

TIME

Wish that the status updates you want to share on Facebook weren’t so permanent? Soon, you may be able to make your posts on the social network vanish without a trace – after a set period of time of your choosing, of course. Similar to popular self-destructing message app SnapChat, your Facebook messages may soon have a limited lifespan of your choosing.

As reported by TheNextWeb, Facebook has begun rolling out these temporary status updates to a select group of users of its iOS smartphone app. Those who have access to the feature can select “expiration” times ranging from one hour to seven days. So if you want to talk about a TV episode, for example, you can have your discussion automatically disappear from your Timeline after it stops being relevant. That means less clutter and more focus on the more important events in your life that you have…

View original post 216 more words

Prevent a Hack on Your ATM PIN


Plato on-line

activistpost-thermo_hack‘You’ve just finished your trip to the grocery store with your debit card, making sure to hide your pin number. But before you get home, the funds in your account are wiped clear. How did this happen?

‘Thanks to an inexpensive and ingenious device that attaches to an iPhone, a new wave of cyber theft allows the holder to commit silent robbery by reading your thermal imprint. There are a variety of ways they can obtain your card number right there or later, but what they really need is your PIN.

‘Mark Rober demonstrates how easy this theft is by actually stealing someone’s PIN in the video below…’
video

5 Things You Learn About Rich People Working at a Nice Hotel
‘The rich and the famous live lives of unthinkable luxury in their gated homes far away from us commoners. But if you want to peer into their bizarre lives…

View original post 277 more words

The Next Step for (Artificial) Intelligent Virtual Assistants


Gigaom

When we talk about the future of artificial intelligence (AI), the discussion often focuses on the advancements and capabilities of the technology, or even the risks and opportunities inherent in the potential cultural implications. What we frequently overlook, however, is the future of AI as a business.

[company]IBM[/company] Watson’s recent acquisition and deployment of [company]Cognea[/company] signals an important shift in the AI and intelligent virtual assistant (IVA) market, and offers an indication of both of the potentials of AI as a business and the areas where the market still needs development.

The AI business is about to be transformed by consolidation. Consolidation carries real risks, but it is generally a sign of technological maturation. And it’s about time, as AI is no longer simply a side project, or an R&D euphemism. AI is finally center stage.

IBM, for all its investment in the Watson platform, was still missing, among other…

View original post 945 more words

The Computer Scientist Trying to Digitize, Analyze and Visualize Our Past


Gigaom

We have written many times over the years about the potential benefits of easy access to data and computing, but we’ve probably never done it this well.

The guest on this week’s Structure Show podcast was Kalev Leetaru (pictured above), the Georgetown researcher behind the Global Database of Events, Language and Tones (GDELT), which we have covered before, and who also helped the Internet Archive with the book-digitization project it unveiled this week. Leetaru, who has spent time programming supercomputers, talks all about the amazing shifts currently underway in information technology that let people gather, store and analyze data with no physical gear and just a few lines (or a single line) of SQL code.

Turkey-1998-12-21-1999-02-19 One of Leetaru’s recent projects analyzed the 120 days surrounding the ouster of Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych in order to find the most-similar 120-day periods globally over the past 35 years.

View original post 62 more words

The Future of Content Consumption


Gigaom

After years struggling through a public identity crisis it appears [company]Yahoo[/company] has decided, for better or worse, that it’s a content company. There will be no Yahoo smartphones or operating systems, no Yahoo Fiber, and no Yahoo drones, robots or satellites. But that doesn’t mean the company can’t innovate.

When it comes to the future of web content, in fact — how we’ll find it, consume it and monetize it — Yahoo might just have the inside track on innovation. I spoke recently with Ron Brachman, the head of Yahoo Labs, who’s now managing a team of 250 (and growing) researchers around the world. They’re experts in fields such as computational advertising, personalization and human-computer interaction, and they’re all focused on the company’s driving mission of putting the right content in front of the right people at the right time.

Really, it’s all about machine learning

However, Yahoo Labs’ biggest focus appears to…

View original post 1,262 more words