Windows 10 Features Businesses Will Love


Technopreneurph

Windows10_1

With Windows XP unsupported and users eager to get off of Windows 7, the much anticipated Windows 10 should be great for businesses. While we already explored a little bit about the exciting Surface Hub for Office Collaboration, we want to break down some of the features that Microsoft is launching with Windows 10 and how they can help businesses become more efficient.

Here are the top features that we think you’ll be interested in:

  1. The return of the start menu.
    One of the biggest obstacles for Windows 8 was the navigation. Removing the start menu was a huge change for the user interface in Windows 8 and one that many didn’t like. For Windows 10, Microsoft is bringing back the start menu with advanced features. A sleek integration of the tiled interface and the old start menu – we’re hoping that it’s the best of both worlds (we’ll let…

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Where Do Recycled Electronics Go?


50 million tons of electronic waste are dumped into landfills worldwide every year.

Big city streets may sound like a hassle regarding waste, but to some, it means that a little less of the millions of tons of e-waste thrown away each year doesn’t end up in landfills, where they are notorious contributors of toxic waste. So what happens to electronics when they’re recycled?

Items that can’t be reused in their current state are wrapped up with all the other recyclable items and shipped in tractor-trailers to a designated recycling plant. After technicians have inspected them, the items are put through a powerful shredder, which breaks them into small chunks. Every plant sorts the materials a little differently but many use an optical sorting system, which uses a laser beam to identify the properties of the hunks that go by on a conveyor belt, which categorizes the pieces into bins for plastic, metal and computer chips. These bins of commodities are then sold on the global market.

Source: Popular Science

Wonderful Computers, Terrible Societies

Computer Tech Bad Society

The Compulsive Explainer

This is the way the world ends – by our things taking over. We get to watch as we slowly fade away. It’s an interesting show – but depressing.

That is probably why most people are unaware that it is happening. Being aware would be too stressful, they think. So they are not aware – of anything. And then wonder why they are vaguely depressed – or seriously depressed. Or suffering from one of a host of mysterious ailments that  no one can understand. But feel certain they are caused by something in the air – that no one can put their finger on.

I do not think this is so mysterious. We have placed all our attention on our wonderful things (our computers) – and not on ourselves. As a result, most people are afraid to be (to attract attention to themselves)- and for that reason, simply do not exist

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What Does Apple Have Planned for Wearable Tech?


Gigaom

It’s Apple event time once again, starting at 10am PT Tuesday. Kevin and I will be covering the event live from the Flint Center for the Performing Arts at DeAnza College in Cupertino, just a few miles from Apple’s headquarters, and we invite you to hang out with us tomorrow.

This is probably going to be a big one: sure, there will be new iPhones, but the real interest is in Apple’s approach to wearable computing, which we’ll finally get a sense of with the demonstration of what we’re still going to call the iWatch for at least another day. [company]Apple[/company] is using the site of two very important events in company history — the original Macintosh launch in 1984 and the iMac launch in 1998 — for this event, and it’s even building some sort of multi-story structure on the campus as part of its preparation.

As we await…

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The Future of Cloud-Based Technology


Technopreneurph

The Future of Cloud Based Technology image Download blue 300x300Cloud-based software and cloud computing are helping to shape the modern economy in incredible ways, disrupting established employment practices and driving a period of incredible innovation.

37% of small businesses have completely integrated cloud software into their daily business operations. That figure has risen from 14% in 2010 and is growing quickly as the benefits of decentralized computing resources become more and more evident to small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Access to a seemingly endless amount of business software with functions ranging beyond accounting and marketing means that smaller businesses and entrepreneurs can now realistically compete with industry leaders. It enables employees to effectively work from home and form teams with coworkers all over the globe. It empowers hobbyists and dreamers to put their ideas in motion and do so with professional tools and advice.

A recent study by Intuit reviews the past and present of cloud software and cloud computing…

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Can Computers Really Ruin My Eyes?


TIME

From sore eyes and blurred vision to headaches, doctors have a catch-all term for any screen-induced discomfort: “Computer vision syndrome,” says Dr. Joshua Dunaief, an ophthalmologist and macular degeneration researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. Dunaief says the specific causes of computer vision syndrome (CVS) are numerous, from improper reading glasses to an overly bright screen. But in most cases, any eye issues you’re experiencing stem from two root issues. Either your eyes are dried out, or they’ve become too fatigued to see properly.

“There are tiny muscles inside your eyeball that change the shape of your eye’s lens in order to bring whatever you’re seeing into focus,” Dunaief explains. After hours of sitting in front of your computer screen, those muscles can grow tired from focusing on a single fixed point. “In some cases, those muscles become so fatigued that your eyes can no longer focus,” Dunaief adds. He…

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The Computer Scientist Trying to Digitize, Analyze and Visualize Our Past


Gigaom

We have written many times over the years about the potential benefits of easy access to data and computing, but we’ve probably never done it this well.

The guest on this week’s Structure Show podcast was Kalev Leetaru (pictured above), the Georgetown researcher behind the Global Database of Events, Language and Tones (GDELT), which we have covered before, and who also helped the Internet Archive with the book-digitization project it unveiled this week. Leetaru, who has spent time programming supercomputers, talks all about the amazing shifts currently underway in information technology that let people gather, store and analyze data with no physical gear and just a few lines (or a single line) of SQL code.

Turkey-1998-12-21-1999-02-19 One of Leetaru’s recent projects analyzed the 120 days surrounding the ouster of Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych in order to find the most-similar 120-day periods globally over the past 35 years.

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A Journey Through The Last 30 Years of Tech


As my forth original post on my WordPress I’m going to share a video of a TED Talk that I’ve watched recently.

This video is a TED Talk presentation made by MIT Media Lab founder, Nicholas Negroponte, a true tech visionary – pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor -, [MIT Media Lab] which helped drive the multimedia revolution and presently houses more than 500 researchers and staff across a broad range of disciplines.

“If Nicholas Negroponte can achieve his ambition of distributing $100 laptops to the world’s disadvantaged children, he will help redefine philanthropy and see his name added to a list alongside the likes of Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller.” — Technology Review

My favourite part of the Talk is this one, which I quote:

«I think the challenge is to connect the last billion people, and connecting the last billion is very different than connecting the next billion, and the reason it’s different is that the next billion are sort of low-hanging fruit, but the last billion are rural. Being rural and being poor are very different. Poverty tends to be created by our society, and the people in that community are not poor in the same way at all. They may be primitive, but the way to approach it and to connect them, the history of One Laptop per Child, and the experiment in Ethiopia, lead me to believe that we can in fact do this in a very short period of time.
And so my plan (…) is to do this with a stationary satellite (…), and for two billion dollars, you can connect a lot more than 100 million people, but the reason I picked two, and I will leave this as my last slide, is two billion dollars is what we were spending in Afghanistan every week. So surely if we can connect Africa and the last billion people for numbers like that, we should be doing it.» – Nicholas Negroponte

The ending of the Talk, with the “last prediction” is also brilliant, scary, visionary and very possible in 20 to 30 years, with the technology advances we’ve seen just on the last century, changing and innovating the tech paradigm, year after year.

«(…) one of the things about learning how to read, we have been doing a lot of consuming of information going through our eyes, and so that may be a very inefficient channel. So my prediction is that we are going to ingest information You’re going to swallow a pill and know English. You’re going to swallow a pill and know Shakespeare. And the way to do it is through the bloodstream. So once it’s in your bloodstream, it basically goes through it and gets into the brain, and when it knows that it’s in the brain in the different pieces, it deposits it in the right places. So it’s ingesting.
(…) This isn’t quite as far-fetched, so 30 years from now.» – Nicholas Negroponte

Thanks again for reading and for following, I hope you’ve liked it and found it interesting.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado