A Park Underneath New York


Dan Barasch and James Ramsey have a crazy plan — to create a park, filled with greenery, underneath New York City.
The two are developing the Lowline, an underground greenspace the size of a football field.
They’re building it in a trolley terminal abandoned in 1948, using technology that harvests sunlight above-ground and directs it down below. It’s a park that can thrive, even in winter.

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The Internet Of Things Will Radically Change Your Big Data Strategy


BusinessWorld

Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons.

The Internet Of Things Will Radically Change Your Big Data Strategy – Forbes.

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Every Single Device Connected to the Internet


TIME

A map of every device connected to the Internet shows the wealthiest parts of the world flush with connections, while poor and sparsely populated parts of the world are blacked out — as well as a few head scratchers in between.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of Shodan, a search engine that probes the Internet’s backend for connections to all sorts of devices from routers to refrigerators. Matherly said it took about five hours to ping every IP address on the Internet and store every positive response. It took another 12 hours to plot the responses on a heat map which glows bright orange in densely connected areas and blue and black in sparsely connected areas.

The United State and Western Europe are, not surprisingly, awash in connectivity. Africa and central Asia have islands of connectivity centered on urban areas. Then there are head-scratchers like Greenland…

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7 Strategies for Making a Brilliant First Impression in 9 Seconds or Less


TIME

As the story goes, my mom and dad, who recently celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary, met at a dance in college. My father introduced himself, saying, “I’m Howard Hogshead from Hudson.”

My mom burst into laughter: “Nobody has the last name Hogshead!!”

Hey, some of us have it lucky when it comes to first impressions.

Even if you don’t have the last name “Hogshead,” you can still make a fascinating first impression and build relationships quickly.

Let’s say you’ve just walked into a big network event. The room buzzes with prospective clients and high-level leaders. You want to introduce yourself… but how?

  1. Find one way to add value to the conversation.

From the moment you meet someone, be asking yourself: “How can I add value to this person?”

What problem is your listener facing and how can you help them overcome it?

You want your listener to come away…

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A Journey Through The Last 30 Years of Tech


As my forth original post on my WordPress I’m going to share a video of a TED Talk that I’ve watched recently.

This video is a TED Talk presentation made by MIT Media Lab founder, Nicholas Negroponte, a true tech visionary – pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor -, [MIT Media Lab] which helped drive the multimedia revolution and presently houses more than 500 researchers and staff across a broad range of disciplines.

“If Nicholas Negroponte can achieve his ambition of distributing $100 laptops to the world’s disadvantaged children, he will help redefine philanthropy and see his name added to a list alongside the likes of Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller.” — Technology Review

My favourite part of the Talk is this one, which I quote:

«I think the challenge is to connect the last billion people, and connecting the last billion is very different than connecting the next billion, and the reason it’s different is that the next billion are sort of low-hanging fruit, but the last billion are rural. Being rural and being poor are very different. Poverty tends to be created by our society, and the people in that community are not poor in the same way at all. They may be primitive, but the way to approach it and to connect them, the history of One Laptop per Child, and the experiment in Ethiopia, lead me to believe that we can in fact do this in a very short period of time.
And so my plan (…) is to do this with a stationary satellite (…), and for two billion dollars, you can connect a lot more than 100 million people, but the reason I picked two, and I will leave this as my last slide, is two billion dollars is what we were spending in Afghanistan every week. So surely if we can connect Africa and the last billion people for numbers like that, we should be doing it.» – Nicholas Negroponte

The ending of the Talk, with the “last prediction” is also brilliant, scary, visionary and very possible in 20 to 30 years, with the technology advances we’ve seen just on the last century, changing and innovating the tech paradigm, year after year.

«(…) one of the things about learning how to read, we have been doing a lot of consuming of information going through our eyes, and so that may be a very inefficient channel. So my prediction is that we are going to ingest information You’re going to swallow a pill and know English. You’re going to swallow a pill and know Shakespeare. And the way to do it is through the bloodstream. So once it’s in your bloodstream, it basically goes through it and gets into the brain, and when it knows that it’s in the brain in the different pieces, it deposits it in the right places. So it’s ingesting.
(…) This isn’t quite as far-fetched, so 30 years from now.» – Nicholas Negroponte

Thanks again for reading and for following, I hope you’ve liked it and found it interesting.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado