Futuristic Display Adds Safety to Driving


Viewing images on the windshield of the car is not exactly a new idea, but the technologies developed so far were concepts only designed for luxury models. The Navdy is a simple heads-up display (HUD) that projects notifications, apps, and driving directions directly from your smartphone to the windshield, guaranteeing to keep your eyes on the road.

The focus of this project is safe driving. The use of cell phones while driving is increasing accidents at an exponential rate worldwide. With Navdy, the driver can perform a series of tasks on their smartphone without taking getting distracted from the road or having to actually look at the device screen.

There are already systems that enable cellphone use by the driver through voice command, but the Navdy seems to do it masterfully. Besides projecting information to the driver, the device recognizes spoken commands and gestures. With this combination of features it allows the drive to answer calls, reply to messages, change songs, check the driving directions indicated on GPS, measure distances traveled and so on.

By its looks, you must have realized what makes Navdy be compatible with virtually any car: the device was designed to be simply attached to the dashboard and its see through HUD does not block the windshield. Furthermore, the device can even display information directly on the windshield of the car.

navdy

For the device to work, you must connect the Navdy into your car’s OBDII port. Besides providing energy, this type of connection also transfers information such as speed, current gear and if there are any mechanical problems.

It is clear that such a project has a few setbacks as well. The fixation to the dashboard needs to be strong enough to not come off in case of a collision, the gesture sensors must be fast so that no time-consuming movements would be necessary and the projected images must be clear for the driver to not get distracted trying to understand them.

But common sense should still apply: even with Navdy allowing the user to reply to a tweet, for example, it is still safer and more prudent to do so when not behind the wheel.

Source: Navdy

See more at: http://interestingengineering.com/navdy-heads-up-display-adds-safety-to-driving

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Big-screened Phones Are Taking Bigger Bites Out Of The Market


Gigaom

Ahead of Apple’s expected release of two iPhones with bigger screens, a fair question to ask is how many people actually want larger phones?

New data from apps analytics firm Flurry finds that big-screened phones — sometimes called “phablets” — are rapidly growing in popularity. Large-screened phones, defined by Flurry as devices with screens between 5- and 7-inches, comprised 6 percent of the nearly 60,000 active devices examined, a huge increase over the 3 percent spotted last year.

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Not only are more users opting for larger phones, but bigger devices are being used more heavily, accounting for 11 percent of app sessions tracked by Flurry. It does appear that people that plan to really hammer their handsets are buying phones with bigger screens, although they may be opting for the faster processor and better cameras that usually come with big-screened phones.

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Flurry didn’t find any evidence that big phones are eating into smaller…

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Can Computers Really Ruin My Eyes?


TIME

From sore eyes and blurred vision to headaches, doctors have a catch-all term for any screen-induced discomfort: “Computer vision syndrome,” says Dr. Joshua Dunaief, an ophthalmologist and macular degeneration researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. Dunaief says the specific causes of computer vision syndrome (CVS) are numerous, from improper reading glasses to an overly bright screen. But in most cases, any eye issues you’re experiencing stem from two root issues. Either your eyes are dried out, or they’ve become too fatigued to see properly.

“There are tiny muscles inside your eyeball that change the shape of your eye’s lens in order to bring whatever you’re seeing into focus,” Dunaief explains. After hours of sitting in front of your computer screen, those muscles can grow tired from focusing on a single fixed point. “In some cases, those muscles become so fatigued that your eyes can no longer focus,” Dunaief adds. He…

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What is the Blue Light From Screens Doing to Our Eyes?


Gigaom

An eye doctor says he’s recently seen a few 35-year-old patients whose lenses, which are typically clear all the way up until around age 40, are so cloudy they resemble 75-year-olds’. A sleep doctor says kids as young as toddlers are suffering from chronic insomnia, which in turn affects their behavior and performance at school and daycare. A scientist finds that women who work night shifts are twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those who sleep at night.

What do all these anecdotes have in common? Nighttime exposure to the blue light emanating from our screens.

You’ve probably heard the hype these past few years: being in the presence of light at night disrupts the body’s natural circadian rhythms by suppressing the production of melatonin, a sleep hormone. But melatonin does far more than help us get sleepy – it’s also an antioxidant that appears to play a…

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