Why People Text And Drive Even Knowing It’s Dangerous


TIME

If you’ve turned on the TV or glanced up at a billboard lately, you know that texting while driving is a bad idea. Celebrities are lending their names to public awareness campaigns, and more than 40 states have banned the practice. A new study surveyed 1,000 drivers and found that 98% of those who text everyday and drive frequently say the practice is dangerous. Still, nearly 75% say they do it anyway.

“There’s a huge discrepancy between attitude and behavior,” says David Greenfield, a University of Connecticut Medical School professor who led the study. “There’s that schism between what we believe and then what we do.”

The lure of text messages is actually a lot like the appeal of slot machines, Greenfield explains: both can be difficult compulsions to overcome for some people. The buzz of an incoming text message causes the release of dopamine in the brain, which generates…

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Futuristic Display Adds Safety to Driving


Viewing images on the windshield of the car is not exactly a new idea, but the technologies developed so far were concepts only designed for luxury models. The Navdy is a simple heads-up display (HUD) that projects notifications, apps, and driving directions directly from your smartphone to the windshield, guaranteeing to keep your eyes on the road.

The focus of this project is safe driving. The use of cell phones while driving is increasing accidents at an exponential rate worldwide. With Navdy, the driver can perform a series of tasks on their smartphone without taking getting distracted from the road or having to actually look at the device screen.

There are already systems that enable cellphone use by the driver through voice command, but the Navdy seems to do it masterfully. Besides projecting information to the driver, the device recognizes spoken commands and gestures. With this combination of features it allows the drive to answer calls, reply to messages, change songs, check the driving directions indicated on GPS, measure distances traveled and so on.

By its looks, you must have realized what makes Navdy be compatible with virtually any car: the device was designed to be simply attached to the dashboard and its see through HUD does not block the windshield. Furthermore, the device can even display information directly on the windshield of the car.

navdy

For the device to work, you must connect the Navdy into your car’s OBDII port. Besides providing energy, this type of connection also transfers information such as speed, current gear and if there are any mechanical problems.

It is clear that such a project has a few setbacks as well. The fixation to the dashboard needs to be strong enough to not come off in case of a collision, the gesture sensors must be fast so that no time-consuming movements would be necessary and the projected images must be clear for the driver to not get distracted trying to understand them.

But common sense should still apply: even with Navdy allowing the user to reply to a tweet, for example, it is still safer and more prudent to do so when not behind the wheel.

Source: Navdy

See more at: http://interestingengineering.com/navdy-heads-up-display-adds-safety-to-driving

Video Of The Planet’s Most Terrifying (and Fictional) Traffic Crossroads


TIME

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Oh my giddy aunt! This is most dangerous traffic intersection in the world. Thank your lucky stars it’s not a real one. With cars whizzing in all directions in endless streams and pedestrians carelessly braving the crossings by threading their way between speeding vehicles, just looking at this video has raised our heartbeat.

Thankfully this intersection doesn’t actually it exist, it’s the work of genius film-maker and editor Fernando Livschitz. By threading together different clips of the same crossroads in Argentina, Livschitz has masterfully created Rush Hour: a video of the planet’s most terrifying (and most fictional) traffic phenomenon.

(via Fastcodesign)

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Trying to Hit the Brake on Texting While Driving


Scott Tibbitts has developed a system that uses a small black box, plugged in under a car’s steering column, to block incoming and outgoing texts and prevent phone calls from reaching the driver.

«(…) a novel way to block incoming and outgoing texts and to prevent phone calls from reaching a driver».

Original Source