A Solar Panel That Doesn’t Block The View


A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window called transparent luminescent solar concentrator, which can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface.Transparent Solar Panel

“Because the materials do not absorb or emit light in the visible spectrum, they look exceptionally transparent to the human eye”.

Original Source – My Science Academy

Where Do Recycled Electronics Go?


50 million tons of electronic waste are dumped into landfills worldwide every year.

Big city streets may sound like a hassle regarding waste, but to some, it means that a little less of the millions of tons of e-waste thrown away each year doesn’t end up in landfills, where they are notorious contributors of toxic waste. So what happens to electronics when they’re recycled?

Items that can’t be reused in their current state are wrapped up with all the other recyclable items and shipped in tractor-trailers to a designated recycling plant. After technicians have inspected them, the items are put through a powerful shredder, which breaks them into small chunks. Every plant sorts the materials a little differently but many use an optical sorting system, which uses a laser beam to identify the properties of the hunks that go by on a conveyor belt, which categorizes the pieces into bins for plastic, metal and computer chips. These bins of commodities are then sold on the global market.

Source: Popular Science

Allergies and Green Spaces


Sociology of Space

allergens

This week i caught an interesting documentry on BBC 2 called ‘Allergies: Modern Life and Me’; the main premise of this show was in explaining the rise in allergy sufferers in modern western society, with a third of the population being affected in some way or another.

While in the past there have been various conflicting views over the cause of allergy suffering in children, there is now a greater consensus with new evidence, suggesting it is to do with the levels of healthy bacteria we are exposed to in early life, from both what we take in from our mothers and the direct environment we are born into.

This bacteria is similar to the cultures found in healthy yogurt drinks that are sold to benefit our health; but these same ones have always existed in nature, and as humans have evolved we have been exposed and built up a dependent relationship…

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Tells GMO Critics to “Chill Out”


Neil deGrasse Tyson – scientist, astrophysicist, author, science communicator and host of the television series “Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey” (2014) – known for defending climate science and the science of evolution, in a video recently posted on YouTube takes a strong stand on another hot-button scientific topic: Genetically modified foods and organisms.

Neil deGrasse Tyson answers a question posed in French about “des plantes transgenetiques” — responding with one of his characteristic, slowly-building rants.

Practically every food you buy in a store for consumption by humans is genetically modified food,” asserts Tyson. “There are no wild, seedless watermelons. There’s no wild cows…You list all the fruit, and all the vegetables, and ask yourself, is there a wild counterpart to this? If there is, it’s not as large, it’s not as sweet, it’s not as juicy, and it has way more seeds in it. We have systematically genetically modified all the foods, the vegetables and animals that we have eaten ever since we cultivated them. It’s called artificial selection.” – Neil deGrasse Tyson

In fairness, critics of GM foods make a variety of arguments that go beyond the simple question of whether the foods we eat were modified prior to the onset of modern biotechnology. They also draw a distinction between modifying plants and animals through traditional breeding and genetic modification that requires the use of biotechnology, and involves techniques such as inserting genes from different species. – Chris Mooney

Original Source