5 Modern Da Vinci’s Rules of Success


Da Vinci Walter RussellWalter Russell is the 20th century Renaissance man you’ve probably never heard of, which in his biography shares the 5 rules that allowed him to accomplish so much. Each rule builds on those prior, culminating in the ultimate recipe for genius.

1) Humility – Make your every action in service of others. Ambitions seeking only to serve the self inevitably end in dissatisfaction.

2) Reverence – Become deeply aware that you are an interpreter of universal consciousness. Know that you have the potential to create anything, to co-create INCREDIBLE things, because you are a tool of the Universe, and are ultimately one with everything.
3) Inspiration – Once you are in a place of knowing with your one-ness with the Universe, you need only silence to bring about divine inspiration.
4) Deep Purpose – Inspiration is useless without direction. You must find your ultimate purpose in this life in order to make full use of your new-found knowledge.
5) Joy & Ecstasy – The joy of achieving refuels you with the energy required to carry on to the next achievement. It is by cultivating a deep-seated, untouchable joy that you become able to realize your genius without any interruptions.

The original article (written by Jordan Lejuwaan) is available here.

Original Source

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How Creative Geniuses Come Up With Great Ideas


News Podge

In 2002, Markus Zusak sat down to write a book.

He began by mapping out the beginning and the end of the story. Then, he started listing out chapter headings, pages of them. Some made it into the final story, many were cut.

When Zusak began to write out the story itself, he tried narrating it from the perspective of Death. It didn’t come out the way he wanted.

He re-wrote the book, this time through the main character’s eyes. Again, something was off.

He tried writing it from an outsider’s perspective. Still no good.

He tried present tense. He tried past tense. Nothing. The text didn’t flow.

He revised. He changed. He edited. By his own estimation, Zusak rewrote the first part of the book 150 to 200 times. In the end, he went back to his original choice and wrote it from the perspective of Death. This time—the…

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R.I.P. “O Captain! My Captain!” Robin Williams


Such a loss…

“O Captain! My Captain!”, I grew up (1993) seeing you and your masterpieces, being inspired by you, smiling and thinking intellectually along your genius, you left us too early, such genius, such masterpieces done…

Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting, Hook, Alladin, Jumanji, Flubber, Mrs. Doubtfire, “Dr. Know” on Artificial Intelligence: AI, Freedom: A History of Us, Hamlet, Great Minds Think for Themselves, Being Human, One Hour Photo, Insomnia, From Time to Time, Seize the Day, etc., I can’t possibly name all of Robin William’s masterpieces that inspired and keep inspiring my and other individuals paths…

See also: Conan O’Brien Delivers Robin Williams News to Stunned Live TV Audience (VIDEO)
Jimmy Fallon, Seth Meyers Pay Tribute to Robin Williams During Latenight Shows

«(…) My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.» – “193. O Captain! My Captain!” by Walt Whitman