5 Tricks for Beating Procrastination


TIME

  • Use short, painless dashes of effort. Just have at it for five minutes and feel free to watch the clock. Chances are you’ll realize it’s not so bad.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

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How to Safely Test Software Without Messing Up Your System


The internet is full of sweet apps, but it’s also packed with shady software. Before you install something awful, give yourself an infosec education. Here are the best tools to protect yourself out there when you’re experimenting with new programs.

Method 1: Virtualize an Entire Desktop with VirtualBox

Method 2: Simpler Virtualization with Cameyo

Method 3: Get Basic Protection with Sandboxie

Safely Test Sofware

Original Source – Lifehacker

Your Smartphone Is Leaking Your Information via Wi-Fi


Get protected with Wi-Fi Privacy PoliceWi-fi Protection


This talk was given at a TEDx event by Bram Bonné, a PhD student in computer science at the Expertise Centre for Digital Media at Hasselt University, where he specializes in computer security and privacy. During his PhD, he developed an interest in privacy-sensitive information leaking from smartphones and laptops. At TEDxGhent 2014, he will scare you by showing the information that is available to anyone willing to listen. But don’t worry, he will also explain what you can do to prevent privacy-sensitive information from leaking.

See also: iPhone Has Secret Software That Can Be Remotely Activated to Spy on People, says Snowden

Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals?


Technopreneurph

Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals? image bigstock Silhouette Of A Hacker Isloate 44548606 600x600

Late last year, Tom Webster and I did a podcast with our six marketing predictions for 2014. Two trends I mentioned were 1) the “malignant complexity” of the web that would lead to an increase in security breaches and 2) the opportunities this would create to actually market data security as a product feature.

In an online world under attack from hackers, terrorists, and just plain old bad guys wanting to wreak havoc, the idea of hack-proof Internet data safety will have to be a product feature trumpeted by new devices, software and service providers.

My prediction is coming true … but with some unexpected consequences.

The bad guys benefit

Keeping people away from your data is not just a feature, it has also become a marketing pitch, as I forecast.

Last week, Apple announced that its new operating system for iPhones would have a new encryption system. In…

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There’s No App for Good Teaching


ideas.ted.com

See all articles in the series

8 ways to think about tech in ways that actually improve the classroom.

Bringing technology into the classroom often winds up an awkward mash-up between the laws of Murphy and Moore: What can go wrong, will — only faster.

It’s a multi-headed challenge: Teachers need to connect with classrooms filled with distinct individuals. We all want learning to be intrinsically motivated and mindful, yet we want kids to test well and respond to bribes (er, extrinsic rewards). Meanwhile, there’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, in the US alone, hoping to sell apps and tech tools to school boards.

There’s no app for that.

But there are touchstones for bringing technology into the classroom. With educational goals as the starting point, not an afterthought, teachers can help students use — and then transcend — technology as they learn.

Children as early as Pre-Kindergarten at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia have access to the iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. https://www.flickr.com/photos/116952757@N08/14161914543 Starting in pre-kindergarten, children at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia, have access to an iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. Photo by Amanda…

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Heidegger in Silicon Valley: Technology and The Hacker Way


Philosophy for change

Racing-with-machines‘Software is eating the world!’ US tech luminary Marc Andreessen declared in 2009, on the eve of launching his venture capital firm, Andreessen-Horowitz. This extraordinary claim has become the mantra of Silicon Valley startup entrepreneurs, codifying a new philosophy of tech entrepreneurialism and kickstarting a bold new era of ‘creative destruction’. Decoded it means: software engineers are world-builders – so look out! Bored with building apps, games, and websites, the latest generation of tech entrepreneurs are creating social operating systems for the societies and economies of the future. Take the sharing economy startup Airbnb, for example (recipent of $112 million in funding from Andreessen-Horowitz in 2011). Andreessen claims:

Airbnb  makes its money in real estate. But … Airbnb … has much more in common with Facebook or Google or Microsoft or Oracle than with any real estate company. … Airbnb is building a software technology that is equivalent in complexity, power, and importance to an operating…

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us


Technopreneurph

You may not be Jennifer Lawrence or Kate Upton, or even know or care who those women are, but you should be aware of the latest “scandal” that included risqué photos of the pop stars and the good old cloud.

Over the Labor Day weekend, it was reported that nude photos of the high-profile celebrities Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us image selfiewere leaked online via the web forum, 4chan, by a “hacker” who was able to get into the celebrities’ personal phone storage and lift the photos from their cloud accounts. The hacker reportedly was looking to make some cash off the photos (although the identity of the hacker hasn’t been uncovered) and had made an announcement that there were more photos that would stay under wraps if he/she received PayPal donations.

Although some of these photos were said to be forgeries, representatives for Jennifer Lawrence and Mary E. Winstead confirmed their authenticity.

And so the…

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5 Lessons From The Celebrity Cloud Hack/Leak


Gigaom

With the dust starting to settle after the dreadful hacking and exposure of various female celebrities’ nude selfies, we’re finally in a position to consider the implications of what happened.

Most of this information isn’t new as such – the episode brought to the fore circumstances and activities that have been around for a while – but there are lessons in there, and it’s time we gave them serious consideration.

1. Some cloud security is unacceptably poor

[company]Apple[/company] uses two-factor authentication (2FA) as a protection for Apple ID management and iTunes and App Store purchases, but not for iCloud backups, which is where many of these pictures came from. Even where the company does employ 2FA, it doesn’t exactly make it easy. What’s more, as Nik Cubrilovic wrote in his excellent in-depth analysis of underground marketplaces and forums, Apple makes it far too easy to execute so-called brute force…

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10 Things You Should Do Every Day To Improve Your Life


TIME

1) Get out in nature

You probably seriously underestimate how important this is. (Actually, there’s research that says you do.) Being in nature reduces stress, makes you more creative, improves your memory and may even make you a better person.

2) Exercise

We all know how important this is, but few people do it consistently. Other than health benefits too numerous to mention, exercise makes you smarter,happier, improves sleep, increases libido and makes you feel better about your body. A Harvard study that has tracked a group of men for more than 70 years identified it as one of the secrets to a good life.

3) Spend time with friends and family

Harvard happiness expert Daniel Gilbert identified this as one of the biggest sources of happiness in our lives. Relationships are worth more than you think (

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