The Decline of ‘Big Soda’


The drop in soda consumption represents the single largest change in the American diet in the last decade.

Over the last 20 years, sales of full-calorie soda in the United States have plummeted by more than 25 percent. Soda consumption, which rocketed from the 1960s through 1990s, is now experiencing a serious and sustained decline.

Sales are stagnating as a growing number of Americans say they are actively trying to avoid the drinks that have been a mainstay of American culture. Sales of bottled water have shot up, and bottled water is now on track to overtake soda as the largest beverage category in two years, according to at least one industry projection.

The drop in soda consumption represents the single largest change in the American diet in the last decade and is responsible for a substantial reduction in the number of daily calories consumed by the average American child. From 2004 to 2012, children consumed 79 fewer sugar-sweetened beverage calories a day, according to a large government survey, representing a 4 percent cut in calories over all. As total calorie intake has declined, obesity rates among school-age children appear to have leveled off.

The change is happening faster in Philadelphia than in the country as a whole. Daily soda consumption among teenagers, a group closely tracked by federal researchers, dropped sharply — by 24 percent — from 2007 to 2013, compared with about 20 percent for the country. Last month, the city Department of Public Health reported a sustained decline in childhood obesity over the last seven years.

Those reductions are not accidents. The soda tax didn’t pass. But the debate about it, along with a series of related city policies, helped discourage people from drinking soda.

 Original Source

A Diet Might Cut the Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s


Chez Froggie

The MIND diet was developed by researchers at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center, whose recent study found that certain foods could help prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Photo: Getty

The MIND diet combines elements of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet, which aims to reduce high blood pressure. The MIND diet also includes ‘brain-healthy’ foods such as lots of green leafy vegetables, blueberries and nuts. A study found adhering strictly to any of the three diets lowered the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. But only the MIND diet had significant benefits even with moderate adherence.ENLARGE
The MIND diet combines elements of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet, which aims to reduce high blood pressure. The MIND diet also includes ‘brain-healthy’ foods such as lots of green leafy vegetables, blueberries and nuts. A study found adhering strictly to any of the three diets lowered the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. But only the MIND diet had significant benefits even with moderate adherence. PHOTO: HARALD WALKER/CORBIS

The study is part of a small body of research investigating how nutrition can improve brain health and stave off the cognitive decline and memory impairment that comes with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Experts…

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When You Lose Weight, Where Does it Go?


Mitch Kirby

Recently, I was sitting and thinking about all of the diet and exercise suggestions that constantly bombard us from all sides. While trying to determine which techniques would likely yield the largest benefits, I decided to start from the beginning and attempted to answer a seemingly simple question: When we lose weight, where does the weight go? When the fat from our waistline disappears, what happens to it? Answering this question was actually way more difficult than I imagined at the start, and forced me to think back to my time as a molecular biology major in order to answer the question effectively.

After uncovering the answer for myself, I asked others to think about the question to see if the solution was more obvious to them than it was to me. Shockingly, even many physicians I asked were unable to answer this question accurately and completely. Below are the most popular answers…

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Google Wants to Make It Easier to Treat Symptoms and Diseases


From now on Oprah’s Dr. Oz will meet it’s instant online match, because Doctor Google has arrived.
Google brought great news for this Winter with it’s new search feature – best yet for hypochondriacs – because from now on google’s search results will include (lists of) symptoms, causes, prevention or treatment options and comparisons of common ailments or diseases with illustrated guides to treatment, way to go Google 🙂

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

TIME

Google searches of common ailments will soon include illustrated guides to treatment, the search giant said Tuesday.

The new feature, which will roll out over the course of this week, will encompass 400 of the most commonly searched medical conditions, from tonsillitis to pink eye. Along with illustrations of the symptoms, the results will include bulleted lists of how frequently the condition occurs and what treatments are available to patients.

“We’re hoping to provide a framework for a more informed conversation with your doctor,” Amit Singhal, Google’s vice president in charge of search, toldUSA Today.

WebMD shares dropped by more than 5% in morning trading, shortly after Google’s announcement.

[time-brightcove videoid=3864878114001]

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What Can Make You Happier, Increase Attention Span and Make You More Courageous?


TIME

Meditation.

I listed it as one of the 10 things should you do every day to improve your life. It can boost happiness.

Via Shawn Achor’s The Happiness Advantage:

Take just five minutes each day to watch your breath go in and out. While you do so, try to remain patient. If you find your mind drifting, just slowly bring it back to focus. Meditation takes practice, but it’s one of the most powerful happiness interventions. Studies show that in the minutes right after meditating, we experience feelings of calm and contentment, as well as heightened awareness and empathy. And, research even shows that regular meditation can permanently rewire the brain to raise levels of happiness, lower stress, even improve immune function.

Increase meaning in life and social support:

The authors tested this build hypothesis in a field experiment with working adults (n = 139), half of whom…

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17 Ways to Age-Proof Your Brain


TIME

What’s good for your body is good for your brain. That means eating a balanced diet with lots of fruits and veggies and not much sugar, saturated fat, or alcohol, as well as getting enough exercise and sleeping about eight hours a night. But evidence is accumulating that a whole host of other activities can help keep our brains young even as we advance in chronological age. There is no one magic activity that you need to take on, but trying a handful of the following will help.

Take dance lessons

Seniors who danced three to four times a week—especially those who ballroom danced—had a 75% lower risk of dementia compared with people who did not dance at all, found a 2003 landmark study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Why? “Dancing is a complex activity,” says study lead author Joe Verghese, MD, chief of geriatrics at Montefiore…

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The Best Workout Move You’re Not Doing


TIME

Want to take your workout to the next level? Consider adding deadlifts to your strength routine.

A new study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that folks who performed the exercise twice weekly for 10 weeks experienced an uptick in torque capacities in both knee extensors and flexors, which were associated with improvements in vertical jump height. In other words, they got faster and had more power when performing explosive movements.

HEALTH.COM:5 Fat-Burning Plyometric Exercises

What’s more, “improving maximal force output with large muscle mass exercises is likely to have carryover to other dynamic movements such as sprinting and box jumps,” explains study author Matt Stock, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Exercise & Sport Sciences at Texas Tech University in Lubbock—which is great news if you’ve been working to master plyometric moves.

Performing a deadlift isn’t just good for putting some…

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The Healthiest Sleeping Positions Infographic


We all know how important the right posture is for your health throughout the day. But did you know that this doesn’t stop once you close your eyes at night?

Which sleeping positions are best, which ones are the sleeping equivalent of walking on your hands? This great infographic lays it all out.

Healthiest Sleeping Positions

Original Source

3 Simple Breakfast Rules to Lose Weight


TIME

Now that the New Year is solidly here, many of us are resolving to eat better, move more, and lose weight. One of the best ways to do this—and make realistic and long-lasting lifestyles changes—is by eating a healthy breakfast every morning. Studies how that eating breakfast jump-starts your metabolism, so it’s an easy way to kick-start your efforts.

HEALTH.COM: The Best Foods to Eat for Breakfast

But when it comes to breakfasts, not all of them are created equal. In fact, some of them can actually derail your weight-loss efforts if you’re not careful. Instead follow these breakfast rules to help you slim down.

Eat right away

Studies have found that eating breakfast helps keep your metabolism revved, so be sure to eat within 30-60 minutes of waking to take advantage of your body’s full fat-burning potential. Eating first thing helps ensure that you don’t feel so…

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What Weight Loss Does To Your Brain


TIME

Too much fat weighs down not just your body, but also your brain.

Obesity harms most organs in the body, and new research suggests the brain is no exception. What’s more, the researchers found that getting rid of excess fat actually improves brain function, reversing the ill effects of the extra weight. The new study, which focused on people who underwent bariatric surgery, found that the procedure had positive effects on the brain, but other research has shown that less invasive weight loss strategies, like exercise, can also reverse brain damage thought to be related to body fat.

Here’s why that matters: Obese men and women are estimated to be about 35% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s compared to people of a normal weight. Some research suggests that body fat ups the number of proteins in the brain that trigger a cascade of events that predispose someone to the disease…

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