Big Data: The New Natural Resource


BusinessWorld

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest. Destroyers of our attention span or innovations that make us smarter and closer? We’re still trying to understand how today’s technologies—which many can’t seem to live without—are transforming us.

Still, there is one change they’ve brought about that’s indisputably positive, one that most people intuitively get.And it’s this: if we live in an information age, then the flip side is we’re all information analysts.

Cloud computing, mobile and social computing are all changing how we communicate. Our strategy for big data and analytics has some core tenants, which provide a common experience. The combination of cloud, social, mobile and big data and analytics provides the user with a role-specific experience that is easy-to-use and customizable. The cloud enables organizations to start small, grow rapidly and scale massively.

Why Big Data Is The New Natural Resource.

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Brief Introduction: Dive Into the World of Data


Data Science- All you need to know.

What is Data science?

Data science is magic.

Magic, not just because it can grow exponentially and unpredictably, neither because of the vastness in context of what each data holds within, but also because it has capability to re-define the entire process of how the perfectly armored and sophisticated model or a product (in theory) can be actually nothing but perfectly imperfect. What is interesting is, even when we do not know “why” the product’s marketability is low, we are ready to make decision with “what” is the reason for product’s marketability to be low. The data is everything. Once you understand the concept why it is important, you begin to know that everything could be possibly made perfect (as close to it as possible).


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Is There a Future For Traditional Apps in The Cloud?


Gigaom

In the article, “To Cloud or Not To Cloud: The Uncertain Future of the Traditional Enterprise App,” Kevin Parker, a principal architect for Rackspace, explores which kinds of traditional apps will thrive in the cloud and how companies that rely on older software can begin the journey toward cloud competence. While traditional apps aren’t cloud-aware, they are far from “legacy” or “obsolete.” On the contrary, analysts who frame the cloud as a one-size-fits-all solution for every flavor of traditional applications are ignoring the complexity that enterprises face with adoption.

In spite of this complexity, however, there are clear benefits to moving these traditional apps to the cloud:

  • You can adopt the cloud gradually:  Think of cloud as a journey, not a sprint. Take a monolithic application—one that is tightly coupled—and break it apart. This makes it easier to determine which pieces run better and are easier to manage in…

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The Future of Cloud-Based Technology


Technopreneurph

The Future of Cloud Based Technology image Download blue 300x300Cloud-based software and cloud computing are helping to shape the modern economy in incredible ways, disrupting established employment practices and driving a period of incredible innovation.

37% of small businesses have completely integrated cloud software into their daily business operations. That figure has risen from 14% in 2010 and is growing quickly as the benefits of decentralized computing resources become more and more evident to small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Access to a seemingly endless amount of business software with functions ranging beyond accounting and marketing means that smaller businesses and entrepreneurs can now realistically compete with industry leaders. It enables employees to effectively work from home and form teams with coworkers all over the globe. It empowers hobbyists and dreamers to put their ideas in motion and do so with professional tools and advice.

A recent study by Intuit reviews the past and present of cloud software and cloud computing…

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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Big Data and Statisticians, Revisited (Video)


What's The Big Data?

Data Science, Big Data and Statistics – can we all live together? from Chalmers Internal on Vimeo.

Terry Speed on how (and a bit on why) statisticians have been left out of the big data movement. Best slide comes at 34:20 and I wish Speed have talked more about how his “personal statistical paradigm” contrasts with the ideology of big data.

“This is the Golden Age of statistics–but not necessarily for statisticians”–Gerry Hahn

“Those who ignore statistics are condemned to re-invent it”–Brad Efron

HT: Nathan Yau

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Tim Berners-Lee’s Campaign for Open Data


ideas.ted.com

Think back: Before Yo, before the cloud, before ubiquitous mobile connectivity, you first interacted with the Internet in your desktop browser. Sir Tim Berners-Lee and others who built the first database of linked information that later became the web haven’t stopped thinking about those early days, and how we can defend the open culture the Internet had then. For Berners-Lee (Watch: Tim Berners-Lee: A Magna Carta for the web) we have to be more than passive consumers: “We can’t just use the web; we have to worry about the underlying structure of the whole thing,” he says in his 2014 talk. That’s why Berners-Lee is focusing on a network of open, linked data. To find out more, explore 12 resources provided by the computer scientist.

1. data.gov.uk

“This began as an initiative back in 2009. Now, data.gov.uk contains more than 9,000 UK government datasets.”

2. data.gov

“This…

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