The World We Explore – Sir Ken Robinson


Hey there,

I’ve found this Youtube video of genius educator Sir Ken Robinson a couple of years ago and bookmarked it.

Today, while doing some “bookmark clean up” on Chrome I found out why I bookmarked it on the first place, and I hope you find it equally interesting and insightful as I did.


Curiosity encourages us to push boundaries into uncharted territories. Where can our hunger for discovery take us – both outside and inside ourselves?

See also: Sir Ken Robinson: The True Story of an Education Revolutionary

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

Adding Tools to Your Mental Toolbox


TIME

In The Art of War Sun Tzu said “The general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought.”

Those ‘calculations’ are the tools we have available to think better. One of the best questions you can ask is how we can make our mental processes work better.

Charlie Munger says that “developing the habit of mastering the multiple models which underlie reality is the best thing you can do.”

Those models are mental models.

They fall into two categories: (1) ones that help us simulate time (and predict the future) and better understand how the world works (e.g. understanding a useful idea from like autocatalysis), and (2) ones that help us better understand how our mental processes lead us astray (e.g., availability bias).

When our mental models line up with reality they help us avoid problems. However, they also cause problems…

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Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer


Ideas

Gregory Currie, a professor of philosophy at the University of Nottingham, recently argued in the New York Times that we ought not to claim that literature improves us as people, because there is no “compelling evidence that suggests that people are morally or socially better for reading Tolstoy” or other great books.

Actually, there is such evidence. Raymond Mar, a psychologist at York University in Canada, and Keith Oatley, a professor emeritus of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto, reported in studies published in 2006 and 2009 that individuals who often read fiction appear to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them and view the world from their perspective. This link persisted even after the researchers factored in the possibility that more empathetic individuals might choose to read more novels. A 2010 study by Mar found a similar result in young children: the more stories…

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The Rise of Intelligent Toys


neuroecology

So there is this new toy called the Anki Drive: basically old-fashioned scalextric (racing cars on a track) combined with an iPhone. It doesn’t sound that exciting at first – just lets you add little things like “shooting missiles” at the other cars to make it a bit more video game-esque.

But the real exciting thing? The iPhone also controls the other cars autonomously, giving each an aggressive, cooperative, etc personality.

Yes: this car gives children the gift of multiple competitive artificial intelligences with unique personalities, as if that is no big deal. Next up: drone friends? Commercialized artificial intelligence in, well,  everything is on its way.

Merry Christmas.

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The Computer Made Us Stupid


The Compulsive Explainer

I should actually say “It has made us even stupider than we were.” Because human stupidity has always been phenomenal – and we have always known this – in our lucid moments.

But our intelligence, in the long run, has always pulled us through. But it looks like we are not going to make it this time around. We have outsmarted ourselves with machines that seem to be smarter than we are. And this has made us afraid to think for ourselves. We are still much smarter than they are – but we can hardly think at all.

We have a new culture that has equated the Computer with God. It has become one of the idols that made the Hebrew God furious. But times and gods have changed and our new pantheon considers the Computer its pet project. And allocates unlimited funds to its development. And very little to human development.

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Preschoolers More Digital-Smart than College Students


An amazing post I’ve read, made by DigitalPlato on Plato on-line – Tech and Investigative Blog, very interesting posts and insights, check it out: http://pochp.wordpress.com

Plato on-line

npr.org-kids-hacking-53cd619692537ccf1f3a563f76917018809451dc-s4-c85They Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets. But is that good or bad news?
‘Ever wonder why children can so easily figure out how to work the TV remote? Or why they “totally get” apps on your smartphone faster than you? It turns out that young children may be more open-minded than adults when it comes to solving problems.

‘Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have found that 4- and 5-year-olds are smarter than college students when it comes to figuring out how toys and gadgets work.

‘So they recruited over 100 preschoolers — 4- and 5-year-old boys and girls — and brought them into the lab. The kids had to figure out how to turn on a music box that could be activated by placing clay shapes either individually or in combination on top of the box. After being shown a whole series of different shapes and…

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How To Teach a Introvert


ideas.ted.com

See all articles in the series

What should we do with the quiet kids? A conversation with Susan Cain on the future of classroom education.

Susan Cain sticks up for the introverts of the world. In the U.S., where one third to one half the population identifies as introverts, that means sticking up for a lot of people. Some of them might be data engineers overwhelmed by the noise of an open-floor-plan office. Others might be lawyers turning 30, whose friends shame them for not wanting a big birthday bash. But Cain particularly feels for one group of introverts: the quiet kids in a classroom.

Cain remembers a childhood full of moments when she was urged by teachers and peers to be more outgoing and social — when that simply wasn’t in her nature. Our most important institutions, like schools and workplaces, are designed for extroverts, says Cain in her TED Talk. [Watch: The power of…

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Google Aims to Archive All Human Knowledge


According to an intriguing report in New Scientist, Google is building a next-generation information database called Knowledge Vault that’s designed to index and store what we can reasonably term facts. And not just some facts — the Vault is intended to continually catalog and store all facts about our world and our history.

See also:  Google “Knowledge Vault” To Power Future Of Search Database could be the foundation for array of next-gen applications

The Vault project is building upon Google’s existing crowdsourced database, Knowledge Graph, and so far has cataloged about 1.6 million facts. Google researchers will present a paper on Knowledge Vault next week at the Conference on Knowledge Discovery at Data Mining, in New York.

It’s all part of a larger initiative, in the information technology arena, to improve the manner in which we interact with machines and databases. Similar knowledge bases are being built by companies like Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft and IBM.

One of the first practical applications for these ultra-database systems is to create a new generation of virtual personal assistants.

Down the line, the Knowledge Vault could serve as the foundation for advanced augmented reality networks. The database would provide instant data, via heads-up display, on virtually anything you look at.

The Knowledge Vault could also be used, eventually, to model all of human history and society as a vast collection of pure data. That knowledge, in turn, could be extrapolated to make predictions about the future.

Original Source
Other Source

What is Your Brain Actually Good At?


What kind of brain do you have and what can you do with it? Quiz Created by Rachel Addine

I know well that these types of generic trivia quizzes are very deterministic, generic and ambiguous, but some of the questions and answer options on this one are interesting. Each option may (or may not) define a type of personality and connect to a certain of the nine types of intelligence.

See also:


Theory of multiple intelligences

Nine Types of Intelligence – Howard Gardner
Documentary – How Does The Human Brain Work?

My (pretty accurate) result of the Quiz:

Logical Brain
You have a logical mind! You notice patterns and are stimulated by your curiosity. You like to get to the bottom of things, and try to base your conclusions on solid evidence. You’re an excellent problem-solver.

7 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going to College


As my fifth original post on my WordPress I’m going to share a very interesting article posted today on Lifehacker which I’ve read and identified with, not only on regarding my education basis, but can be also applied on many other fields and life personal experiences.

Check it out here: Seven Things I Wish I Knew Before Going to Graduate School

The article is very insightful and interesting, discussing how if “you’re headed to grad school, the game changes”, and it really does, having a “reputation for being the most difficult time in a student’s life”, coming after a “long undergrad career, bringing empty pockets, longer classes, and teaching requirements to students—on top of the stress of independent studies or a thesis”, besides being an “eye-opening and fulfilling part of your academic career” and “opening doors you’ll appreciate for the rest of your life”.

«First and foremost, you need to ask yourself whether it is worth it to do grad school.»

I also suggest that you watch this open-minded and in the spirit of ideas worth spreading TEDx Talk (at Almada, Portugal, September 26th, 2012), combining to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group, from Fernando Santana – Catedratic Professor at Universidade Nova de Lisboa, and currently Director of the School of Science and Technology – discussing objectively  about why do you take an university/college course, sharing many conclusions of case studies and personal/professional experiences.

 

The author of this Lifehacker’s post, Alan Henry, speaks and discusses very openly and with great precision about a couple of things what he and others from Lifehacker’s team “learned from our graduate schooling that you can take with you going in”.
The listing is awesome and very precise, starting with:

1. Be Prepared for a Level of Competition You’ve Never Experienced Before
«
(…) my classmates were intent on making sure they were at the top of the class, well-known and liked by professors and classmates, and as active in class activities as possible.»

«Normally a little friendly competition is healthy, but when it came time to work together in teams or collaborate, the competition was ridiculous. (…) When it came to the grunt work, like compiling research, interest waned. Tread carefully and hone your people skills.»

2. Intelligence Isn’t As Important As You Think It Is
«
When you’re an undergrad, your intelligence is highly valued. In graduate school, and truthfully, anywhere after that, intelligence is important, but it doesn’t pay the bills.

(…) the degree to which you’re knowledgeable on a specific topic isn’t enough anymore. You likely won’t be the smartest person in the room, and even if you are, you need to be diligent, confident, and communicate well too. You’ll meet people less intelligent than you who are better at those soft skills. And you know what? You’ll see them getting their feet into doors you won’t, and it’ll sting.»

«Intelligence is certainly still a door-opener. But it will never get the job done on its own. Diligence, rigour, a reliable network, and finally not being a dick are essential qualities of not just software engineering but any profession that’s outside the little bubble called grad school.» – Manuel Ebert

3. Do Everything and Make Connections: That’s What You’re Really There For
«(…) make sure you take the time to meet people, spent time with different people, and, for lack of a better word, “network” with as many people as possible. You will tap into them at some point for postgraduate projects, and they’ll do the same with you.

Do everything extra you can: This applies to a bachelor’s degree too, of course, but I think the extra-curricular stuff in grad school is really way more important than it is during a bachelor’s program.» – Thorin Klosowski
«You may have heard this advice before: Do all the extracurriculars you possibly can. Go to the guest speakers and lectures. Join study groups. Go on offsites and class trips. Join student societies. Assist professors who are looking for grad students to help out. When you do, you’re building on our first point: You’re meeting the people you’ll make valuable connections with. You’re also learning how to network professionally without being sleazy about it, which is one of those soft skills that will take you places.»

4. Leave Your Comfort Zone Behind
«
It may cause you some anxiety—in my case, it was a lot of anxiety—but it’s one thing you should absolutely get ready for. No one will force you to attend those guest lectures, or travel for talks and conferences. No one will insist you go study abroad for a term, or work in someone else’s lab for a little while so you can offer your expertise. You could stay at home and coast, and ignore all of those events, just because it’s easier to. Don’t do it.»

5. Embrace the “Poor Grad Student” Stereotype, Even If You’re Not
«
Depending on your personal situation, that can be true. Even if it’s not and you can afford to feed yourself without resorting to ramen noodles and frozen vegetables, sometimes it’s better if you embrace that stereotype anyway.

We’re not saying you can’t enjoy a decent place to live and good food if you can afford it, but keeping your lifestyle neat, portable, and minimal now will serve you later when the student loan bills start coming in

6. Keep Your Textbooks and Find Your Niche
«
Unlike undergraduate schooling, which focuses on giving you a broad education on your major, in grad school you’ll expand on what you learned and drill down into specific topics. Don’t coast and just flow with the curriculum—take the time to find parts of your studies that really interest you. Ideally, this is how you’ll uncover your future career.

When you do find it, connect as much as possible with the people involved with it. As you study that specific topic, you’ll learn about where the best research on the topic is being performed and who you can talk to at your current school that’s involved with it.»

7. Don’t Expect Anything After Graduating
«It doesn’t really matter which field you studied, but just because you have a shiny new MBA doesn’t mean you’ll get a high-paying job the month you graduate. In the sciences, being a freshly minted post-doc just means you get to compete with everyone else who graduated that year for a slot in someone’s lab. You still have a long way to go.»

«If you have those connections we mentioned earlier, the whole process is a little easier. Your business school colleagues may have leads to share, or they may be starting their own companies. The professors you worked with may bring you into their labs, or write recommendations to help you get into great institutions. Even so, don’t expect anything—you’ll still need to work your ass off to get a job

Alan Henry argues that “if you’re expecting a miraculous sense of self-fulfillment or accomplishment when you graduate, you may be out of luck”, as Thorin Klosowski (who also went to grad school) notes:

Don’t expect to “get” anything when you graduate: Most liberal arts programs are about teaching you how to learn and how to think. A graduate program’s no different—and if you walk in expecting to finish some grandiose project or have a sense of completion, you’ll be disappointed. Instead, you’ll walk away being more confused about the world than when you started, BUT you’ll at least be able to explain your way through it a little better. To that point, I’d argue that when you’re picking out a school, atmosphere and culture-fit is WAY more important in grad school than in an undergrad program. Your general view of the world, and how you think about it will be tainted by the grad program you choose, so pick one that you think is relevant and interesting.

The author of the post ends beautifully by saying:
However, because grad school is part education, part work, and part professional networking, there’s more to the picture you should remember before diving in. If you’re headed for graduate school next term, hopefully this is useful to you. Grad school can be grueling, stressful, and challenging, or it can be easier than your undergrad schooling—a lot of it is how you approach it and what you take away from the experience. Have some fun, enjoy the journey, and as they say, consider the destination as its own reward. – Alan Henry

My faculty colleague and recently graduated in Communication Sciences, Sofia Cintra, added to my upper short texts of my brilliant WordPress (her words, not mine): “Don’t expect nothing and smile”, that’s how she graduated with an awesome average and is currently on her way to a Masters degree, good luck Sofia 😀

Thanks again for reading and for following, I hope you’ve liked it and found it interesting.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado