How We Can Reprogram Life Wisely



For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. “This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on,” Enriquez says. “This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had.”

Wisdom From Great Writers On Every Year Of Life



As different as we humans are from one another, we all age along the same great sequence, and the shared patterns of our lives pass into the pages of the books we love. In this moving talk, journalist Joshua Prager explores the stages of life through quotations from Norman Mailer, Joyce Carol Oates, William Trevor and other great writers, set to visualizations by graphic designer Milton Glaser. “Books tell us who we’ve been, who we are, who we will be, too,” Prager says.

10 Simple Ways to Become a Productivity Dynamo

Simples rules to simplify work, office and organizations

In a Digital Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?


It is no longer enough to record seemingly every last moment of life with your smartphone, it seems. Near-death is fair game, too.

Thanks to the Personal Video IndustrialComplex tens of millions of video-enabled smartphones, feeding countless hours daily to video-sharing behemoths like YouTube rock concerts, presidential inaugurations, fourth-grade school plays and even midair near-disasters can all be considered “content” now, inspiring us all to tap our inner Edward R. Murrow and record the event for posterity.

But even as public gatherings, from the world-historical to the intimate, evolve into a sea of glowing blue screens, a backlash has started to take root. An improbable assortment of critics — mindfulness gurus, twee indie rockers, even, seemingly, Pope Francis — have started to implore these armchair videographers to drop their phones and actually start living again.

To live the moment or record the moment? It’s become a defining dilemma of the iPhone age.

I’ve read this article on The New York Times and it touches many aspects (very superficially I may add) of globalization, contemporary civil society, social, political, economic and value changes emerged by modernity.
It misses some aspects and doesn’t develop (many) others, this is my sociological perspective and rigor speaking, nevertheless it’s interesting.
Second: there’s no such thing as “iPhone Age” NY Times editors, there is an “digital age”, “information/knowledge age” and the “mobility age”, etc.
“Viral”, “audience”, “academics” and “paparazzis” concepts should be better defined and developed on the article, and please, PLEASE, don’t compare “celebrities” with “audience” and regular “people” and social agents, they stand on a field apart from the “regular joe”.

Original Source: A Defining Question in an iPhone Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?

The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Center for Advanced Hindsight

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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