How We Can Reprogram Life Wisely



For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. “This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on,” Enriquez says. “This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had.”

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Wisdom From Great Writers On Every Year Of Life



As different as we humans are from one another, we all age along the same great sequence, and the shared patterns of our lives pass into the pages of the books we love. In this moving talk, journalist Joshua Prager explores the stages of life through quotations from Norman Mailer, Joyce Carol Oates, William Trevor and other great writers, set to visualizations by graphic designer Milton Glaser. “Books tell us who we’ve been, who we are, who we will be, too,” Prager says.

Living Life Without Regret: 3 Secrets From Research


TIME

First, what do we regret the most?

And for the big picture: what do people regret the most before they die?

1. “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”

2. “I wish I didn’t work so hard.”

3. “I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.”

4. “I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.”

5. “I wish that I had let myself be happier.”

So what can you do to live a life without regret?

  • First, stop worrying…

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4 Foods That May Shorten Your Life


TIME

Everyone wants to know the secret to living longer. There’s no telling what exactly helps some people make it to 100, but healthy eating is one thing that sure does help.

Some foods, though, could actually hurt your chances of growing older by messing with components in your cells called telomeres. These little caps on the ends of your chromosomes are key for protecting DNA from damage—many experts compare them to the plastic tips on the end of shoelaces.

HEALTH.COM:13 Everyday Habits That Are Aging You

Thing is, as your cells replicate, telomeres get shorter over time, according to the University of Utah Health Sciences. As telomeres shorten it can trigger cells to malfunction and die, and shorter telomeres have been linked to conditions like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Research has also shown lifestyle factors including diet can speed up (or slow down) the shortening process, which is sometimes…

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10 Simple Ways to Become a Productivity Dynamo

Simples rules to simplify work, office and organizations

TIME

You’re only productive at work three days out of the week. How can you improve that?

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In a Digital Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?


It is no longer enough to record seemingly every last moment of life with your smartphone, it seems. Near-death is fair game, too.

Thanks to the Personal Video IndustrialComplex tens of millions of video-enabled smartphones, feeding countless hours daily to video-sharing behemoths like YouTube rock concerts, presidential inaugurations, fourth-grade school plays and even midair near-disasters can all be considered “content” now, inspiring us all to tap our inner Edward R. Murrow and record the event for posterity.

But even as public gatherings, from the world-historical to the intimate, evolve into a sea of glowing blue screens, a backlash has started to take root. An improbable assortment of critics — mindfulness gurus, twee indie rockers, even, seemingly, Pope Francis — have started to implore these armchair videographers to drop their phones and actually start living again.

To live the moment or record the moment? It’s become a defining dilemma of the iPhone age.

I’ve read this article on The New York Times and it touches many aspects (very superficially I may add) of globalization, contemporary civil society, social, political, economic and value changes emerged by modernity.
It misses some aspects and doesn’t develop (many) others, this is my sociological perspective and rigor speaking, nevertheless it’s interesting.
Second: there’s no such thing as “iPhone Age” NY Times editors, there is an “digital age”, “information/knowledge age” and the “mobility age”, etc.
“Viral”, “audience”, “academics” and “paparazzis” concepts should be better defined and developed on the article, and please, PLEASE, don’t compare “celebrities” with “audience” and regular “people” and social agents, they stand on a field apart from the “regular joe”.

Original Source: A Defining Question in an iPhone Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?

How To Tell if Your Life Is On Track


TIME

Sir Ray Avery, entrepreneur and author of Rebel With A Cause, says it’s as easy as counting your days.

“When you’re born, you’re born with 30,000 days. That’s it. The best strategic planning I can give to you is to think about that.”

He’s 65. So he’s “got about 5,625 days to live.” Then he just works backward to plan.

Via Techcrunch (HT: 99U):

“For me, I can reverse engineer my life to achieve much more than you guys. Every day I do a chart on what I’ve achieved and where I want to be. And it makes you scary-as-shit clever,” Avery said. “So think about that. You’ve got 30,000 days and the clock is ticking.”

Mind-blowingly simple yet it makes so much sense.

9 minutes in to his famous Stanford commencement speech Steve Jobs discussed the importance he placed on thinking about death during life:

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Why You Read 1000 Things About Change and Never Change


TIME

Knowing isn’t doing.

I post a lot of stuff about getting better at things. A common response to my posts is “I know that.”

Knowing is great for watching Jeopardy. It’s not nearly as good for life.

So why is learning about improvement so easy and actually improving so damn hard?

Most any change that requires a lot of consistent mental effort is going to fail because you spend most of the day on autopilot.

Via Charles Duhigg’s excellent book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business:

One paper published by a Duke University researcher in 2006 found that more than 40 percent of the actions people performed each day weren’t actual decisions, but habits.

Any change has to work when you’re on autopilot. The importance of self-control is one of the biggest myths about improvement.

Almost all the techniques for change…

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The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Center for Advanced Hindsight

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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How To Train Your Brain To Prefer Healthy Food


TIME

Which is more appealing: cheese pizza or salad? For many, the lure of lettuce hardly matches that of greasy comfort food, but new brain research from Tufts University published in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes suggests that reconditioning can train adults to prefer healthy food and shun the junk.

“We don’t start out in life loving French fries and hating, for example, whole wheat pasta,” said study co-author and Tufts University professor Susan B. Roberts in a press release. “This conditioning happens over time in response to eating – repeatedly! – what is out there in the toxic food environment.”

The researchers studied the brain scans of 13 people, then assigned eight of them to a new behavioral intervention geared toward weight loss. The program taught lessons on portion control and distributed menu plans geared around specific dietary targets, encouraging people to get 25% of their energy from protein and…

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