How Our Photo Obsession is Threatening Our Memories


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Why Sarcastic People Are Smarter Than You


Neuroscience Is The New Black

sarcastic

Sarcasm, as they say, is the ability to insult stupid people without them realizing it.

In some cases, sarcasm is a means of indirectly expressing aggression toward others or insecurity about oneself, as Psychology Today puts it. In other cases, it’s more of a secret shield from all the moronic buffoons in the world – a sort of a “true lie” that listeners won’t always comprehend as being insincere.

It’s a private joke that can save you from annoying and aggravating situations, providing a respite in humor even in the crappiest situations.

So are sarcastic people just certified smart asses, or are we more intelligent (at least on an emotional level) than non-sarcastic people? … more

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How Smartphones Are Changing How Thumbs and Brains Communicate


Smartphone Use - Thumbs and BrainOpposable thumbs gave ancient humans a huge evolutionary advantage by allowing for use of tools. More recently, these thumbs also allow for people to quickly type on screens of smartphones and other touchscreen devices. A new study has found that this recent widespread mode of communication is actually changing the way thumbs and the brain talk to one another, demonstrating the plasticity of the human brain. Arko Ghosh of the University of Zurich is lead author of the paper, which has been published in Current Biology.

Read more about How Smartphone Use Is Changing The Way Thumbs and Brains Communicate (IFL Science).

Behavioral Science improves Airport Efficiency


Chez Froggie

Big Brother as helper, trying to predict our patterns of boarding, moving carry-on bags, lounge seating habits, and even how to control smokers.

WSJ: Pelle Guldborg Hansen, a behavioral scientist, is trying to figure out how to board passengers on a plane with less fuss.

The goal is to make plane-boarding more efficient by coaxing passengers to want to be more orderly, not by telling them they must. It is one of many projects in which Dr. Hansen seeks to encourage people, when faced with options, to make better choices. Among these: prompting people to properly dispose of cigarette butts outside of bars and clubs and inducing hospital workers to use hand sanitizers.

Dr. Hansen, 37 years old, is director of the Initiative for Science, Society & Policy, a collaboration of the University of Southern Denmark and Roskilde University. The concept behind his work is known commonly as a nudge…

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