The 5 Ws of Mobile Commerce Optimization


Technopreneurph

The 5 Ws of Mobile Commerce Optimization image shutterstock 188282693

Everywhere you turn, it seems, people are talking about how understanding context is the most important aspect of building a better web.

No one, though, has captured it as well as Code and Theory’s Dan Gardner, co-founder and executive creative director of the creative agency, and Mike Treff, managing partner of the agency’s product design group, who wrote an article for FastCompany titled “The Next Big Thing in Responsive Design.” (Among other accomplishments, Code and Theory redesigned the LA Times website and Mashable, and created award-winning marketing programs for Burger King, Dr Pepper and Maybelline New York.) Though the whole thing is worth reading, this is the sentence that matters most for our purposes:

“As brands become more publisher-like, they’ll also need to incorporate a responsive philosophy that adapts to the user so that they can reach them at the right time, with the right messaging, and an understanding of…

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Google Aims to Archive All Human Knowledge


According to an intriguing report in New Scientist, Google is building a next-generation information database called Knowledge Vault that’s designed to index and store what we can reasonably term facts. And not just some facts — the Vault is intended to continually catalog and store all facts about our world and our history.

See also:  Google “Knowledge Vault” To Power Future Of Search Database could be the foundation for array of next-gen applications

The Vault project is building upon Google’s existing crowdsourced database, Knowledge Graph, and so far has cataloged about 1.6 million facts. Google researchers will present a paper on Knowledge Vault next week at the Conference on Knowledge Discovery at Data Mining, in New York.

It’s all part of a larger initiative, in the information technology arena, to improve the manner in which we interact with machines and databases. Similar knowledge bases are being built by companies like Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft and IBM.

One of the first practical applications for these ultra-database systems is to create a new generation of virtual personal assistants.

Down the line, the Knowledge Vault could serve as the foundation for advanced augmented reality networks. The database would provide instant data, via heads-up display, on virtually anything you look at.

The Knowledge Vault could also be used, eventually, to model all of human history and society as a vast collection of pure data. That knowledge, in turn, could be extrapolated to make predictions about the future.

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How Businesses Should Prepare For Internet Of Things


BusinessWorld

The IT industry creates new buzzwords every few years and this year everyone is talking about Internet of Things and Internet of Everything.

But what really is the true definition of IoT and what are its constituents? How should businesses prepare?

There are several definitions. But IoT or IoE is really about networks, devices, people and processes – and how these are all getting interconnected. The enabling technologies are mobility, cloud computing, big data analytics and social – a collective term for this is SMAC.

For IoT to be widely accepted and implemented, there are 2 or 3 things that need to happen:

  1. Businesses need to become IoT ready by upgrading its infrastructure, re-engineering processes and business models, and infusing an IoT culture in the organization.
  2. We need to have widely accepted industry standards, compliance, frameworks and protocols, through strong consortiums.
  3. Businesses need to be crystal clear about what they…

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Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites


digiphile

This morning, I read an interesting reflection on dealing with online cruelty in the New York Times by Stephanie Rosenbloom:

In the virtual world, anonymity and invisibility help us feel uninhibited. Some people are inspired to behave with greater kindness; others unleash their dark side. Trolls, who some researchers think could be mentally unbalanced, say the kinds of things that do not warrant deep introspection; their singular goal is to elicit pain. But then there are those people whose comments, while nasty, present an opportunity to learn something about ourselves.

Easier said than done. Social scientists say we tend to fixate on the negative. However, there are ways to game psychological realities. Doing so requires understanding that you are ultimately in charge. “Nobody makes you feel anything,” said Professor Suler, adding that you are responsible for how you interpret and react to negative comments. The key is managing what psychologists…

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Mobile Commerce Myths – Fact vs. Fiction


Technopreneurph

Mobile Commerce Myths: Fact vs. Fiction image Stocksy txpbc7a74c04p8000 Large 319041 300x200It’s common knowledge that mobile commerce capabilities are crucial to any business that sells online. In fact, the U.S. mobile commerce market is poised to hit $114 billion in 2014, and projected to influence more than $600 billion in total retail sales by 2016, according to Forrester Research. eBusiness professionals are aware of the dire need to create an engaging mobile experience for shoppers and integrate this experience with an overarching omnichannel strategy. However, mobile commerce itself is still mired in haze of myths and misconceptions, surrounding strategy and technology within a dynamic and disrupted marketplace.

We’ve just released a new white paper that aims to dispel some of these myths and help guide online retailers towards a successful mobile commerce strategy. Let’s take a look at a few of the key myths:

Responsive Web Design is the silver bullet

Acting literally as a “one size fits all” solution, responsive…

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This Is Who/What Facebook Thinks You Are/Like


Last quarter, Facebook made $2.8 billion off our personal information. Starting this summer, the social network is letting us see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers.

Learn how, find out why you’ve been targeted and check what else Facebook thinks you like

Facebook has spent years mining from your online activity, against which it sells hyper-targeted advertising. If you are one of Facebook’s 204 million users in the United States and Canada, the social network made about $5.79 in advertising revenue off you last quarter.

On some level, we all know that Facebook does this, and on some level we all accept it. But starting this summer, Facebook is letting us lift the curtain and see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers. If you hover over the top, right-hand corner of any Facebook ad, you can access a dropdown menu that will let you hide certain ads, rate ads as helpful, or — this is the interesting part — see why a particular advertiser chose to target you.
Among the potential reasons: your age, your gender, your location, pages you’ve liked, pages your friends have liked, your propensity to click on similar ads, where you shop online, what kind of phone you have, your inferred hobbies … or “other reasons”.TIME

See also:

Original Source – TIME