6 Things the Most Organized People Do Every Day


TIME

Your life is busy. Work/life balance is a challenge. You feel like you’re spreading yourself so thin that you’re starting to disappear.

Most of us feel that way. But not all of us. The most organized people don’t.

As NYT bestselling author and neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin explains, the VIP’s he’s met don’t seem scattered and frantic.

They’re calm, cool and “in the moment”, not juggling nine things and worried about being done by 7PM.

It’s not hard to figure out why: they have help — aides and assistants to take care of these things so the VIP can be “in the moment.”

Via The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload:

In the course of my work as a scientific researcher, I’ve had the chance to meet governors, cabinet members, music celebrities, and the heads of Fortune 500 companies. Their skills and accomplishments vary, but…

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7 Things Learned From Watching TEDxCERN


1) Water is weird.
2) Thanks to a particle detector mounted on the International Space Station, scientists are keeping tabs on a lot of cosmic rays.
3) A surprising threat to the rainforest? Noise.
4) The future of antibiotics may lie in silver nanoparticles.
5) Cardiovascular medicine is becoming easier to get (in Cameroon).
6) We owe our lives to aerosol particles.
7) Despite what it may seem at times, we are living in a hugely exciting moment.

Read more about each thing at: 7 things learned from a day spent watching TEDxCERN

TED Blog

slider_speakers

Wednesday marked the second-ever TEDxCERN, the event organized by the folks at CERN, the famed particle physics research center in Geneva, Switzerland, responsible for bringing us the World Wide Web, the Large Hadron Collider, and confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson. You know, just a few minor things.

TEDxCERN brought together a mix of experts from across the sciences and the world, people all working to answer the question: “What are the big ideas in science that will help us address tomorrow’s major global problems?” Particle physicist (and three-time TED speaker) Brian Cox served as quippy host, while more than a thousand attendees watched live in CERN’s Globe of Science and Innovation.

If you weren’t one of the lucky thousand, or were too swamped with work to catch the live webcast, don’t despair. We watched for you. And created a list of things we…

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Why Cops In America Kill So Many People


I’ve read about this on Business Insider here: Here’s One Theory About Why Cops In America Kill So Many People

The chart shown on is very interesting and so are the theories behind it.

«The FBI reports that in 2011, cops in America killed 404 suspects in acts of “justifiable homicide.”» – Business Insider

«Last year, police in England did not record a single shooting fatality, with officers across the country only firing weapons on three occasions. Cops on the street in England do not carry firearms.

In Australia, where police do carry handguns, gun control is relatively tight. Police in some states receive special training for dealing with mentally ill suspects.» – Business Insider

“We see this as a product of the continuing arms race between law enforcement and civilians that has been going on for decades.” (…) The arms race means “police officers have legitimate fears about the nature of the firepower they are confronting on a daily basis” – Business Insider

Original Source

5 Skills of Power and How You Can Learn to Use Them


ideas.ted.com

Eric Liu is on a mission to make civics “as sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.” As he describes in today’s TED Talk (watch: Why ordinary people need to understand power), we are at a moment of crisis in the United States. The average person simply doesn’t know how to participate in local government, and this means that clout is disproportionately concentrated in the hands of the few who do. Liu’s solution to this imbalance? That we teach everyone the basic skills of power.

As the people of Ferguson, Missouri, stand up against police brutality, the topic of how to take back civic power is on many minds. Through Citizen University, Liu is creating a shared curriculum of power that will be available soon. In the meantime, he offers up several basic skills it will include, to help anyone interested in influencing change right now.

Skill #1: Understand the system.

“Before you…

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7 Things the Most Interesting People All Have in Common


TIME

I’ve posted a lot of research from experts on getting people to like you, being influential and having great conversations.

What’s the best way to use all this information to be more interesting?

1) First, Don’t Be Boring

Sometimes the best offense is a good defense. Look at it like the Hippocratic Oath of conversations: Do no harm.

We’re all terrible at realizing when we bore others because, well, we all think we’re just fascinating.

The #1 tip for never boring anyone comes from Scott Adams: Be brief, be positive.

If you’re always to the point and stay upbeat, it’s extremely hard for anyone to accuse you of being poor company.

But sometimes you do need to speak a little longer to make sure things don’t get stilted.

The Art of Civilized Conversation offers another good tip: Is anyone asking you questions about what you’re saying?

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17 Maps That Will Change How You See the World


TIME

1. The map that will scare most coffee snobs.

More info via Euromonitor International

2. The map that proves how much Bhutan loves archery.

Earl Andrew / Wikipedia

More info here

3. The map that pinpoints the hairiest populations.

Undress 006 / Wikipedia

More info via Undress 006 on Wikipedia

4. The map that shows Asia prefers spirits to beer.

More info via ChartsBin

5. The map that says people in the Philippines feel the most loved.

More info via the Washington Post

6. The map that suggests more divorce lawyers should move to Spain.

More info via imgur

7. The map that proves you’re driving on the wrong side of the street (or not).

More info via ChartsBin

8. The map that reveals the “black holes” of Internet censorship.

Reporters Without Borders

More info via Reporters Without Borders on Ads of the World

9. The map that…

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Making Sense of Big Data: Without It, Your Company’s Data Is Useless


Gigaom

Big data has become so big, it’s spread beyond the tech world. When 163-year-old publication New York Times hired a chief data scientist earlier this year, it became clear that even non-technical organizations were hopping on the big data train. To successfully predict what their customers want or how they might behave, companies that know how to mine big data — also know as companies who hire good data scientists — have the advantage.

To do their jobs effectively, data scientists must do a whole lotta dirty data work. The New York Times calls it “data janitor work.” In a recent article, NYT reported that data scientists spend from 50 percent to 80 percent of their time laboriously collecting and prepping data before it can be extracted into digestible insights.

“Data wrangling is a huge — and surprisingly so — part of the job,” Monica Rogati, VP for…

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