In a Digital Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?


It is no longer enough to record seemingly every last moment of life with your smartphone, it seems. Near-death is fair game, too.

Thanks to the Personal Video IndustrialComplex tens of millions of video-enabled smartphones, feeding countless hours daily to video-sharing behemoths like YouTube rock concerts, presidential inaugurations, fourth-grade school plays and even midair near-disasters can all be considered “content” now, inspiring us all to tap our inner Edward R. Murrow and record the event for posterity.

But even as public gatherings, from the world-historical to the intimate, evolve into a sea of glowing blue screens, a backlash has started to take root. An improbable assortment of critics — mindfulness gurus, twee indie rockers, even, seemingly, Pope Francis — have started to implore these armchair videographers to drop their phones and actually start living again.

To live the moment or record the moment? It’s become a defining dilemma of the iPhone age.

I’ve read this article on The New York Times and it touches many aspects (very superficially I may add) of globalization, contemporary civil society, social, political, economic and value changes emerged by modernity.
It misses some aspects and doesn’t develop (many) others, this is my sociological perspective and rigor speaking, nevertheless it’s interesting.
Second: there’s no such thing as “iPhone Age” NY Times editors, there is an “digital age”, “information/knowledge age” and the “mobility age”, etc.
“Viral”, “audience”, “academics” and “paparazzis” concepts should be better defined and developed on the article, and please, PLEASE, don’t compare “celebrities” with “audience” and regular “people” and social agents, they stand on a field apart from the “regular joe”.

Original Source: A Defining Question in an iPhone Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?

Why Losing Your Phone Is Worse Than Losing Your Wallet


Technopreneurph

There has been a recurring thought concerning mobile phone security that has been on my mind lately, and as I have been discussing it with clients, it is beginning to make me nervous to know that others out there may not be as aware.

It started with this article I read that discusses the lack of support from mobile phone carriers for a ?kill switch? for our smartphones in case they are stolen. Why? Cell phone thefts currently account for 30 to 40 percent of all robberies nationwide, and cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012 according to data from the Federal Communications Commission. Wireless carriers are generating a substantial amount of revenue through their insurance programs offered for smartphones. If our phones had a ?kill switch? (a means of completely disabling the phone), then there would be virtually no incentive for criminals to take them. As a result…

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Trying to Hit the Brake on Texting While Driving


Scott Tibbitts has developed a system that uses a small black box, plugged in under a car’s steering column, to block incoming and outgoing texts and prevent phone calls from reaching the driver.

«(…) a novel way to block incoming and outgoing texts and to prevent phone calls from reaching a driver».

Original Source

Prevent a Hack on Your ATM PIN


Plato on-line

activistpost-thermo_hack‘You’ve just finished your trip to the grocery store with your debit card, making sure to hide your pin number. But before you get home, the funds in your account are wiped clear. How did this happen?

‘Thanks to an inexpensive and ingenious device that attaches to an iPhone, a new wave of cyber theft allows the holder to commit silent robbery by reading your thermal imprint. There are a variety of ways they can obtain your card number right there or later, but what they really need is your PIN.

‘Mark Rober demonstrates how easy this theft is by actually stealing someone’s PIN in the video below…’
video

5 Things You Learn About Rich People Working at a Nice Hotel
‘The rich and the famous live lives of unthinkable luxury in their gated homes far away from us commoners. But if you want to peer into their bizarre lives…

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Tracking The Intersection on Big Data and Mobile Data Trends Jason Bowden


Technopreneurph

Tracking The Intersection on Big Data and Mobile Data Trends image custom data analytics 600x300

Image credit: http://ift.tt/X7zY0t

Big data is viewed as a medium by which companies can grow their business through the process of targeting the enhancement of productivity using analytics and wide database of information. Business data provides a wealth of information that can help companies do business with better competence in addressing the changing marketing trends within their respective marketing industry. When harnessed properly it can serve a significant purpose to help companies grow their business.

Business data analysis is currently viewed by internet marketing Atlanta as the future of digital marketing. In combination with the growing trends of mobile data utilization, both the big data and mobile data trends are considered to be intersecting across the online marketing portals. Both sources of data are viewed as powerful sources of driving businesses further towards better productivity and competence for a more responsive marketing strategy.

The powerful big data and mobile data…

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Mobile Advertising Rockets In India, World’s Fastest-growing Smartphone Market


Abogado Aly

Mobile advertising volume in India grew the fastest in the world, climbing a record 260% since July 2013, even as the larger Asia-Pacific region where ad impressions delivery rose 70% this year, emerged the fastest-growing region globally.

from Forbes – Business http://ift.tt/1tpE4eC
via Abogado Aly Business Consulting

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Big-screened Phones Are Taking Bigger Bites Out Of The Market


Gigaom

Ahead of Apple’s expected release of two iPhones with bigger screens, a fair question to ask is how many people actually want larger phones?

New data from apps analytics firm Flurry finds that big-screened phones — sometimes called “phablets” — are rapidly growing in popularity. Large-screened phones, defined by Flurry as devices with screens between 5- and 7-inches, comprised 6 percent of the nearly 60,000 active devices examined, a huge increase over the 3 percent spotted last year.

device_type_blog_v1

Not only are more users opting for larger phones, but bigger devices are being used more heavily, accounting for 11 percent of app sessions tracked by Flurry. It does appear that people that plan to really hammer their handsets are buying phones with bigger screens, although they may be opting for the faster processor and better cameras that usually come with big-screened phones.

app_sessions_blog_v1

Flurry didn’t find any evidence that big phones are eating into smaller…

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us


Technopreneurph

You may not be Jennifer Lawrence or Kate Upton, or even know or care who those women are, but you should be aware of the latest “scandal” that included risqué photos of the pop stars and the good old cloud.

Over the Labor Day weekend, it was reported that nude photos of the high-profile celebrities Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us image selfiewere leaked online via the web forum, 4chan, by a “hacker” who was able to get into the celebrities’ personal phone storage and lift the photos from their cloud accounts. The hacker reportedly was looking to make some cash off the photos (although the identity of the hacker hasn’t been uncovered) and had made an announcement that there were more photos that would stay under wraps if he/she received PayPal donations.

Although some of these photos were said to be forgeries, representatives for Jennifer Lawrence and Mary E. Winstead confirmed their authenticity.

And so the…

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5 Lessons From The Celebrity Cloud Hack/Leak


Gigaom

With the dust starting to settle after the dreadful hacking and exposure of various female celebrities’ nude selfies, we’re finally in a position to consider the implications of what happened.

Most of this information isn’t new as such – the episode brought to the fore circumstances and activities that have been around for a while – but there are lessons in there, and it’s time we gave them serious consideration.

1. Some cloud security is unacceptably poor

[company]Apple[/company] uses two-factor authentication (2FA) as a protection for Apple ID management and iTunes and App Store purchases, but not for iCloud backups, which is where many of these pictures came from. Even where the company does employ 2FA, it doesn’t exactly make it easy. What’s more, as Nik Cubrilovic wrote in his excellent in-depth analysis of underground marketplaces and forums, Apple makes it far too easy to execute so-called brute force…

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