Why Losing Your Phone Is Worse Than Losing Your Wallet


Technopreneurph

There has been a recurring thought concerning mobile phone security that has been on my mind lately, and as I have been discussing it with clients, it is beginning to make me nervous to know that others out there may not be as aware.

It started with this article I read that discusses the lack of support from mobile phone carriers for a ?kill switch? for our smartphones in case they are stolen. Why? Cell phone thefts currently account for 30 to 40 percent of all robberies nationwide, and cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012 according to data from the Federal Communications Commission. Wireless carriers are generating a substantial amount of revenue through their insurance programs offered for smartphones. If our phones had a ?kill switch? (a means of completely disabling the phone), then there would be virtually no incentive for criminals to take them. As a result…

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Biker Evading Robbery at Gunpoint Recorded by GoPro


What would you do…?

Biker Evades Robbery Attempt at Gunpoint, Captures It All on GoPro



Trying to Hit the Brake on Texting While Driving


Scott Tibbitts has developed a system that uses a small black box, plugged in under a car’s steering column, to block incoming and outgoing texts and prevent phone calls from reaching the driver.

«(…) a novel way to block incoming and outgoing texts and to prevent phone calls from reaching a driver».

Original Source

Why Cops In America Kill So Many People


I’ve read about this on Business Insider here: Here’s One Theory About Why Cops In America Kill So Many People

The chart shown on is very interesting and so are the theories behind it.

«The FBI reports that in 2011, cops in America killed 404 suspects in acts of “justifiable homicide.”» – Business Insider

«Last year, police in England did not record a single shooting fatality, with officers across the country only firing weapons on three occasions. Cops on the street in England do not carry firearms.

In Australia, where police do carry handguns, gun control is relatively tight. Police in some states receive special training for dealing with mentally ill suspects.» – Business Insider

“We see this as a product of the continuing arms race between law enforcement and civilians that has been going on for decades.” (…) The arms race means “police officers have legitimate fears about the nature of the firepower they are confronting on a daily basis” – Business Insider

Original Source

5 Skills of Power and How You Can Learn to Use Them


ideas.ted.com

Eric Liu is on a mission to make civics “as sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.” As he describes in today’s TED Talk (watch: Why ordinary people need to understand power), we are at a moment of crisis in the United States. The average person simply doesn’t know how to participate in local government, and this means that clout is disproportionately concentrated in the hands of the few who do. Liu’s solution to this imbalance? That we teach everyone the basic skills of power.

As the people of Ferguson, Missouri, stand up against police brutality, the topic of how to take back civic power is on many minds. Through Citizen University, Liu is creating a shared curriculum of power that will be available soon. In the meantime, he offers up several basic skills it will include, to help anyone interested in influencing change right now.

Skill #1: Understand the system.

“Before you…

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The Anonymous App Used by the Police to Fight Bullies and Porn


Gigaom

In an open-floor office in the Philippines, an army of people stare at computers full of Whispers. There are 130 people to be exact, each skimming twenty posts at a time on their PC screens. They click and click and click, flagging Whispers here and there to be deleted or elevated to the company’s San Francisco team.

This is how content moderation works for the world of anonymous apps, and it all happens under the roof of one outsourcing firm called TaskUs. It’s labor intensive and it’s a massive, expensive endeavor. Whisper has used a TaskUs team in the Philippines for two years, since the company’s earliest beginnings, but now it’s not the only anonymous app doing so.

Gigaom has learned that Yik Yak, the lesser known anonymous app beloved by teens, began using TaskUs a few weeks ago and that Secretunder fire to explain how it will deal with…

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