Company Leaders Worried With Mobile Surveillance


Technopreneurph

3 Reasons Why Company Leaders Should Be Worried About Mobile Surveillance image cell no text.280by280.png

Disturbing news regarding government surveillance of mobile devices en masse has permeated our news this year. In the wake of Edward Snowden?s allegations, the public learned about cellular interceptors attached to fake cell towers. Popular Science and the CEO of CryptoPhone broke the news about these strange towers, which could be used ?a variety of ?over-the-air? attacks become possible, from eavesdropping on calls and texts to pushing spyware to the device.?

Fast forward a few months, and the Wall Street Journal publishes an article describing a secret government program that involves flying airplanes over the United States to collect massive amounts of cellular data. Sources familiar with the program explain that that this program was run by the U.S. Marshals Service program since 2007. These massive breaches of privacy shouldn?t just matter to individual consumers ? they can also impact companies as well. The use of dirt boxes, stingrays and…

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Facebook Using Social Sciences


CreepTicker

A few months ago, Bonnie Tsui wrote a piece over at Pacific Standarad on Facebook’s Compassion Research Day. 

According to Tsui, the social media giant has brought together social scientists from across the Ivy League to help it better understand how people interact online. 

Specifically, Facebook was concerned about anti-social social networking behaviour. How can users better communicate their dissatisfaction with unflattering pictures? How can we help teens cope with bullying? 

On one level this is all great: Facebook fine tunes its tools so that users are better able to voice their concerns. However, I notice that the newly developed solutions usually involve deeper investment in Facebook: sending messages to other users, opening up conversations with other user. 

“The changes have more than tripled the rate at which people send a message directly to another user asking for a photo to be removed. And of those requests, 85 percent of the…

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Will We Have Any Privacy After the Big Data Revolution?


TIME

Does the rise of big data mean the downfall of privacy? Mobile technologies now allow companies to map our every physical move, while our online activity is tracked click by click. Throughout 2014, BuzzFeed’s quizzes convinced millions of users to divulge seemingly private responses to a host of deeply personal questions. Although BuzzFeed claimed to mine only the larger trends of aggregate data, identifiable, personalized information could still be passed on to data brokers for a profit.

But the big data revolution also benefits individuals who give up some of their privacy. In January of this year, President Obama formed a Big Data and Privacy Working Group that decided big data was saving lives and saving taxpayer dollars, while also recommending new policies to govern big data practices. How much privacy do we really need? In advance of the Zócalo event “Does Corporate America Know Too Much About You?

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us


Technopreneurph

You may not be Jennifer Lawrence or Kate Upton, or even know or care who those women are, but you should be aware of the latest “scandal” that included risqué photos of the pop stars and the good old cloud.

Over the Labor Day weekend, it was reported that nude photos of the high-profile celebrities Keep Your Personal Information, Personal: What The Celebrity Photo Hack Can Teach Us image selfiewere leaked online via the web forum, 4chan, by a “hacker” who was able to get into the celebrities’ personal phone storage and lift the photos from their cloud accounts. The hacker reportedly was looking to make some cash off the photos (although the identity of the hacker hasn’t been uncovered) and had made an announcement that there were more photos that would stay under wraps if he/she received PayPal donations.

Although some of these photos were said to be forgeries, representatives for Jennifer Lawrence and Mary E. Winstead confirmed their authenticity.

And so the…

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5 Lessons From The Celebrity Cloud Hack/Leak


Gigaom

With the dust starting to settle after the dreadful hacking and exposure of various female celebrities’ nude selfies, we’re finally in a position to consider the implications of what happened.

Most of this information isn’t new as such – the episode brought to the fore circumstances and activities that have been around for a while – but there are lessons in there, and it’s time we gave them serious consideration.

1. Some cloud security is unacceptably poor

[company]Apple[/company] uses two-factor authentication (2FA) as a protection for Apple ID management and iTunes and App Store purchases, but not for iCloud backups, which is where many of these pictures came from. Even where the company does employ 2FA, it doesn’t exactly make it easy. What’s more, as Nik Cubrilovic wrote in his excellent in-depth analysis of underground marketplaces and forums, Apple makes it far too easy to execute so-called brute force…

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This Is Who/What Facebook Thinks You Are/Like


Last quarter, Facebook made $2.8 billion off our personal information. Starting this summer, the social network is letting us see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers.

Learn how, find out why you’ve been targeted and check what else Facebook thinks you like

Facebook has spent years mining from your online activity, against which it sells hyper-targeted advertising. If you are one of Facebook’s 204 million users in the United States and Canada, the social network made about $5.79 in advertising revenue off you last quarter.

On some level, we all know that Facebook does this, and on some level we all accept it. But starting this summer, Facebook is letting us lift the curtain and see exactly what pieces of our online identities it reveals to advertisers. If you hover over the top, right-hand corner of any Facebook ad, you can access a dropdown menu that will let you hide certain ads, rate ads as helpful, or — this is the interesting part — see why a particular advertiser chose to target you.
Among the potential reasons: your age, your gender, your location, pages you’ve liked, pages your friends have liked, your propensity to click on similar ads, where you shop online, what kind of phone you have, your inferred hobbies … or “other reasons”.TIME

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Original Source – TIME