Company Leaders Worried With Mobile Surveillance


Technopreneurph

3 Reasons Why Company Leaders Should Be Worried About Mobile Surveillance image cell no text.280by280.png

Disturbing news regarding government surveillance of mobile devices en masse has permeated our news this year. In the wake of Edward Snowden?s allegations, the public learned about cellular interceptors attached to fake cell towers. Popular Science and the CEO of CryptoPhone broke the news about these strange towers, which could be used ?a variety of ?over-the-air? attacks become possible, from eavesdropping on calls and texts to pushing spyware to the device.?

Fast forward a few months, and the Wall Street Journal publishes an article describing a secret government program that involves flying airplanes over the United States to collect massive amounts of cellular data. Sources familiar with the program explain that that this program was run by the U.S. Marshals Service program since 2007. These massive breaches of privacy shouldn?t just matter to individual consumers ? they can also impact companies as well. The use of dirt boxes, stingrays and…

View original post 472 more words

Why People Text And Drive Even Knowing It’s Dangerous


TIME

If you’ve turned on the TV or glanced up at a billboard lately, you know that texting while driving is a bad idea. Celebrities are lending their names to public awareness campaigns, and more than 40 states have banned the practice. A new study surveyed 1,000 drivers and found that 98% of those who text everyday and drive frequently say the practice is dangerous. Still, nearly 75% say they do it anyway.

“There’s a huge discrepancy between attitude and behavior,” says David Greenfield, a University of Connecticut Medical School professor who led the study. “There’s that schism between what we believe and then what we do.”

The lure of text messages is actually a lot like the appeal of slot machines, Greenfield explains: both can be difficult compulsions to overcome for some people. The buzz of an incoming text message causes the release of dopamine in the brain, which generates…

View original post 176 more words

Futuristic Display Adds Safety to Driving


Viewing images on the windshield of the car is not exactly a new idea, but the technologies developed so far were concepts only designed for luxury models. The Navdy is a simple heads-up display (HUD) that projects notifications, apps, and driving directions directly from your smartphone to the windshield, guaranteeing to keep your eyes on the road.

The focus of this project is safe driving. The use of cell phones while driving is increasing accidents at an exponential rate worldwide. With Navdy, the driver can perform a series of tasks on their smartphone without taking getting distracted from the road or having to actually look at the device screen.

There are already systems that enable cellphone use by the driver through voice command, but the Navdy seems to do it masterfully. Besides projecting information to the driver, the device recognizes spoken commands and gestures. With this combination of features it allows the drive to answer calls, reply to messages, change songs, check the driving directions indicated on GPS, measure distances traveled and so on.

By its looks, you must have realized what makes Navdy be compatible with virtually any car: the device was designed to be simply attached to the dashboard and its see through HUD does not block the windshield. Furthermore, the device can even display information directly on the windshield of the car.

navdy

For the device to work, you must connect the Navdy into your car’s OBDII port. Besides providing energy, this type of connection also transfers information such as speed, current gear and if there are any mechanical problems.

It is clear that such a project has a few setbacks as well. The fixation to the dashboard needs to be strong enough to not come off in case of a collision, the gesture sensors must be fast so that no time-consuming movements would be necessary and the projected images must be clear for the driver to not get distracted trying to understand them.

But common sense should still apply: even with Navdy allowing the user to reply to a tweet, for example, it is still safer and more prudent to do so when not behind the wheel.

Source: Navdy

See more at: http://interestingengineering.com/navdy-heads-up-display-adds-safety-to-driving

Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals?


Technopreneurph

Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals? image bigstock Silhouette Of A Hacker Isloate 44548606 600x600

Late last year, Tom Webster and I did a podcast with our six marketing predictions for 2014. Two trends I mentioned were 1) the “malignant complexity” of the web that would lead to an increase in security breaches and 2) the opportunities this would create to actually market data security as a product feature.

In an online world under attack from hackers, terrorists, and just plain old bad guys wanting to wreak havoc, the idea of hack-proof Internet data safety will have to be a product feature trumpeted by new devices, software and service providers.

My prediction is coming true … but with some unexpected consequences.

The bad guys benefit

Keeping people away from your data is not just a feature, it has also become a marketing pitch, as I forecast.

Last week, Apple announced that its new operating system for iPhones would have a new encryption system. In…

View original post 630 more words

Will We Have Any Privacy After the Big Data Revolution?


TIME

Does the rise of big data mean the downfall of privacy? Mobile technologies now allow companies to map our every physical move, while our online activity is tracked click by click. Throughout 2014, BuzzFeed’s quizzes convinced millions of users to divulge seemingly private responses to a host of deeply personal questions. Although BuzzFeed claimed to mine only the larger trends of aggregate data, identifiable, personalized information could still be passed on to data brokers for a profit.

But the big data revolution also benefits individuals who give up some of their privacy. In January of this year, President Obama formed a Big Data and Privacy Working Group that decided big data was saving lives and saving taxpayer dollars, while also recommending new policies to govern big data practices. How much privacy do we really need? In advance of the Zócalo event “Does Corporate America Know Too Much About You?

View original post 944 more words

Why Losing Your Phone Is Worse Than Losing Your Wallet


Technopreneurph

There has been a recurring thought concerning mobile phone security that has been on my mind lately, and as I have been discussing it with clients, it is beginning to make me nervous to know that others out there may not be as aware.

It started with this article I read that discusses the lack of support from mobile phone carriers for a ?kill switch? for our smartphones in case they are stolen. Why? Cell phone thefts currently account for 30 to 40 percent of all robberies nationwide, and cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012 according to data from the Federal Communications Commission. Wireless carriers are generating a substantial amount of revenue through their insurance programs offered for smartphones. If our phones had a ?kill switch? (a means of completely disabling the phone), then there would be virtually no incentive for criminals to take them. As a result…

View original post 1,193 more words

Trying to Hit the Brake on Texting While Driving


Scott Tibbitts has developed a system that uses a small black box, plugged in under a car’s steering column, to block incoming and outgoing texts and prevent phone calls from reaching the driver.

«(…) a novel way to block incoming and outgoing texts and to prevent phone calls from reaching a driver».

Original Source

A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

View original post 179 more words