How Our Photo Obsession is Threatening Our Memories


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In a Digital Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?


It is no longer enough to record seemingly every last moment of life with your smartphone, it seems. Near-death is fair game, too.

Thanks to the Personal Video IndustrialComplex tens of millions of video-enabled smartphones, feeding countless hours daily to video-sharing behemoths like YouTube rock concerts, presidential inaugurations, fourth-grade school plays and even midair near-disasters can all be considered “content” now, inspiring us all to tap our inner Edward R. Murrow and record the event for posterity.

But even as public gatherings, from the world-historical to the intimate, evolve into a sea of glowing blue screens, a backlash has started to take root. An improbable assortment of critics — mindfulness gurus, twee indie rockers, even, seemingly, Pope Francis — have started to implore these armchair videographers to drop their phones and actually start living again.

To live the moment or record the moment? It’s become a defining dilemma of the iPhone age.

I’ve read this article on The New York Times and it touches many aspects (very superficially I may add) of globalization, contemporary civil society, social, political, economic and value changes emerged by modernity.
It misses some aspects and doesn’t develop (many) others, this is my sociological perspective and rigor speaking, nevertheless it’s interesting.
Second: there’s no such thing as “iPhone Age” NY Times editors, there is an “digital age”, “information/knowledge age” and the “mobility age”, etc.
“Viral”, “audience”, “academics” and “paparazzis” concepts should be better defined and developed on the article, and please, PLEASE, don’t compare “celebrities” with “audience” and regular “people” and social agents, they stand on a field apart from the “regular joe”.

Original Source: A Defining Question in an iPhone Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?

The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Center for Advanced Hindsight

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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The Periodic Table Of SEO Success Factors



See also:

CREATIVE GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Search engine optimization — SEO — may seem like alchemy to the uninitiated. But there is a science to it. Search engines reward pages with the right combination of ranking factors, or “signals.” SEO is about ensuring your content generates the right type of signals.

seo-table

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Finger Powered Mobile Phone Battery Charger


Zid's zone

A mobile battery that could be charged by spinning it around your fingers! (It reminds me of the time when i was having fun spinning my audio cassette tapes around my fingers trying to manually rewind it). This concept gadget was designed by Song Teaho & Hyejin Lee . The concept design promises quick charging in places where a wall socket is not available to charge your mobile phone. Based on the

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How Creative Geniuses Come Up With Great Ideas


News Podge

In 2002, Markus Zusak sat down to write a book.

He began by mapping out the beginning and the end of the story. Then, he started listing out chapter headings, pages of them. Some made it into the final story, many were cut.

When Zusak began to write out the story itself, he tried narrating it from the perspective of Death. It didn’t come out the way he wanted.

He re-wrote the book, this time through the main character’s eyes. Again, something was off.

He tried writing it from an outsider’s perspective. Still no good.

He tried present tense. He tried past tense. Nothing. The text didn’t flow.

He revised. He changed. He edited. By his own estimation, Zusak rewrote the first part of the book 150 to 200 times. In the end, he went back to his original choice and wrote it from the perspective of Death. This time—the…

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Big-screened Phones Are Taking Bigger Bites Out Of The Market


Gigaom

Ahead of Apple’s expected release of two iPhones with bigger screens, a fair question to ask is how many people actually want larger phones?

New data from apps analytics firm Flurry finds that big-screened phones — sometimes called “phablets” — are rapidly growing in popularity. Large-screened phones, defined by Flurry as devices with screens between 5- and 7-inches, comprised 6 percent of the nearly 60,000 active devices examined, a huge increase over the 3 percent spotted last year.

device_type_blog_v1

Not only are more users opting for larger phones, but bigger devices are being used more heavily, accounting for 11 percent of app sessions tracked by Flurry. It does appear that people that plan to really hammer their handsets are buying phones with bigger screens, although they may be opting for the faster processor and better cameras that usually come with big-screened phones.

app_sessions_blog_v1

Flurry didn’t find any evidence that big phones are eating into smaller…

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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