The Best Way to Learn a New Skill on the Job


TIME

Week one of my new job I was in a full-scale internal panic. Why? I was a Web Producer who only knew the very basics of coding.

Yeah, the justified kind of panic.

I certainly didn’t misrepresent my skills in what was a very short interview for a temporary position. I had online marketing experience, graphic design experience, Photoshop, Illustrator, WordPress, yes. But Dreamweaver? No. Experience designing web pages from the ground up? No. Big no.

But as they needed someone ASAP and I believe my boss was told by a previous boss that I’m a fast learner, I was hired as a 30-hour-a-week temp for four months. Now two and a half months into the job, and while I’m certainly not designing templates from scratch, I can look at a page of HTML/CSS, read it as the language it is, make adjustments and additions, and even put together a…

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10 Simple Ways to Become a Productivity Dynamo

Simples rules to simplify work, office and organizations

TIME

You’re only productive at work three days out of the week. How can you improve that?

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The 10 Job Skills You Need


TIME

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

The world of work—and the world in general—is changing. People are living longer, new technologies are emerging, and we’ve never been more globally connected. That means the skills we use now in the workplace are not necessarily the skills we’ll need in the future.

To get a sense of what skills you might want to start investing your time into developing, check out the infographic below. (Note: It might sound like 2020 is really far into the future, but it’s actually only about five years away.)

Important Work Skills for 2020

Infographic courtesy of Top10OnlineColleges.org.

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Crucial Job Skills Employers Are Really Looking For


TIME

Labor Day offers an opportunity for politicians and economists to offer their two cents on the state of labor. It’s a good bet that some of that commentary will focus on the so-called “skills gap” — the notion that millions of jobs in highly technical fields remain unfilled while millions of Americans without those skills remain unemployed.

The solution according to the pundits? Education and training that focus on technical skills like computer engineering, or on crucial but scarce skills like welding. Match these newly trained employees with open jobs that require those skills and, voila, the skills gap is gone — and the labor market is steadied.

If only it were so simple.

Yes, more American workers need to learn skills that are underrepresented in the labor market. And yes, those technology titans who advocate for more challenging school curricula, for greater funding for science and engineering education and…

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5 Skills of Power and How You Can Learn to Use Them


ideas.ted.com

Eric Liu is on a mission to make civics “as sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.” As he describes in today’s TED Talk (watch: Why ordinary people need to understand power), we are at a moment of crisis in the United States. The average person simply doesn’t know how to participate in local government, and this means that clout is disproportionately concentrated in the hands of the few who do. Liu’s solution to this imbalance? That we teach everyone the basic skills of power.

As the people of Ferguson, Missouri, stand up against police brutality, the topic of how to take back civic power is on many minds. Through Citizen University, Liu is creating a shared curriculum of power that will be available soon. In the meantime, he offers up several basic skills it will include, to help anyone interested in influencing change right now.

Skill #1: Understand the system.

“Before you…

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