Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals?


Technopreneurph

Are Apple and Google Protecting Us or the Criminals? image bigstock Silhouette Of A Hacker Isloate 44548606 600x600

Late last year, Tom Webster and I did a podcast with our six marketing predictions for 2014. Two trends I mentioned were 1) the “malignant complexity” of the web that would lead to an increase in security breaches and 2) the opportunities this would create to actually market data security as a product feature.

In an online world under attack from hackers, terrorists, and just plain old bad guys wanting to wreak havoc, the idea of hack-proof Internet data safety will have to be a product feature trumpeted by new devices, software and service providers.

My prediction is coming true … but with some unexpected consequences.

The bad guys benefit

Keeping people away from your data is not just a feature, it has also become a marketing pitch, as I forecast.

Last week, Apple announced that its new operating system for iPhones would have a new encryption system. In…

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Why Losing Your Phone Is Worse Than Losing Your Wallet


Technopreneurph

There has been a recurring thought concerning mobile phone security that has been on my mind lately, and as I have been discussing it with clients, it is beginning to make me nervous to know that others out there may not be as aware.

It started with this article I read that discusses the lack of support from mobile phone carriers for a ?kill switch? for our smartphones in case they are stolen. Why? Cell phone thefts currently account for 30 to 40 percent of all robberies nationwide, and cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012 according to data from the Federal Communications Commission. Wireless carriers are generating a substantial amount of revenue through their insurance programs offered for smartphones. If our phones had a ?kill switch? (a means of completely disabling the phone), then there would be virtually no incentive for criminals to take them. As a result…

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Is There a Future For Traditional Apps in The Cloud?


Gigaom

In the article, “To Cloud or Not To Cloud: The Uncertain Future of the Traditional Enterprise App,” Kevin Parker, a principal architect for Rackspace, explores which kinds of traditional apps will thrive in the cloud and how companies that rely on older software can begin the journey toward cloud competence. While traditional apps aren’t cloud-aware, they are far from “legacy” or “obsolete.” On the contrary, analysts who frame the cloud as a one-size-fits-all solution for every flavor of traditional applications are ignoring the complexity that enterprises face with adoption.

In spite of this complexity, however, there are clear benefits to moving these traditional apps to the cloud:

  • You can adopt the cloud gradually:  Think of cloud as a journey, not a sprint. Take a monolithic application—one that is tightly coupled—and break it apart. This makes it easier to determine which pieces run better and are easier to manage in…

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The Future of Cloud-Based Technology


Technopreneurph

The Future of Cloud Based Technology image Download blue 300x300Cloud-based software and cloud computing are helping to shape the modern economy in incredible ways, disrupting established employment practices and driving a period of incredible innovation.

37% of small businesses have completely integrated cloud software into their daily business operations. That figure has risen from 14% in 2010 and is growing quickly as the benefits of decentralized computing resources become more and more evident to small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Access to a seemingly endless amount of business software with functions ranging beyond accounting and marketing means that smaller businesses and entrepreneurs can now realistically compete with industry leaders. It enables employees to effectively work from home and form teams with coworkers all over the globe. It empowers hobbyists and dreamers to put their ideas in motion and do so with professional tools and advice.

A recent study by Intuit reviews the past and present of cloud software and cloud computing…

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It’s Time for Storage to Smarten Up Already


Gigaom

DataGravity, the thus-far secretive startup co-founded by Paula Long of EqualLogic fame, is finally ready to talk about its DataGravity Discovery storage array.

Lately, much of the discussion around storage has been about speeds and feeds of the latest flash arrays — and that’s valid. But Long’s position is that much of the value of what companies store is lost because that data goes into a black box, and companies have to deploy audit software and other extras it to wring important information out of it. [company]DataGravity[/company] integrates those tools, search and analytics, into its software.

Aggregating data about the data

What are some examples of that important information? For instance: Who at the company accessed a file and how often? Who is working together on shared files? Is there personally identifiable information (PII) or credit card information sitting in documents? Which files have not been touched in two years? All of that…

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