Let’s navigate in Portugal again


Muito antes de Startups e o Web Summit em Lisboa serem fixes, “haja novamente navegadores em Portugal” 🙂

«Anda com tipos melhores do que tu, mais sonhadores, com mais força, porque vais crescer com eles, não te rodeies daquelas pessoas fáceis que só estão bem a assobiar e a querer mudar o mundo com opiniões. Não se muda o Mundo com assobios, não se muda o mundo com críticas fáceis ao trabalho dos outros, muda-se o mundo com acção, com trabalho.»

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

Kiribati country will be Underwater Soon – Unless We Work Together


For the people of Kiribati, climate change isn’t something to be debated, denied or legislated against — it’s an everyday reality. The low-lying Pacific island nation may soon be underwater, thanks to rising sea levels.
In a personal conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Kiribati President Anote Tong discusses his country’s present climate catastrophe and its imperiled future. “In order to deal with climate change, there’s got to be sacrifice. There’s got to be commitment,” he says. “We’ve got to tell people that the world has changed.”

See also:

How An Internet Without Screens Might Look Like


Hey there everyone,
Today I’m sharing another TED Talk: “An Internet without screens might look like this“.

The speaker Tom Uglow starts by saying that «we’re surrounded by natural light and organic elements. Natural things make us happy. And happiness is a great motivator; we strive for happiness. Perhaps that’s why we’re always redesigning everything, in the hopes that our solutions might feel more natural. So let’s start there — with the idea that good design should feel natural.»


He adds that «your phone is not very natural. And you probably think you’re addicted to your phone, but you’re really not. We’re not addicted to devices, we’re addicted to the information that flows through them. I wonder how long you would be happy in your happy place without any information from the outside world. I’m interested in how we access that information, how we experience it. We’re moving from a time of static information, held in books and libraries and bus stops, through a period of digital information, towards a period of fluid information, where your children will expect to be able to access anything, anywhere at any time, from quantum physics to medieval viticulture, from gender theory to tomorrow’s weather, just like switching on a lightbulb».

He continues the talk by telling that «Humans also like simple tools. Your phone is not a very simple tool. A fork is a simple tool…and we don’t like them made of plastic, in the same way I don’t really like my phone very much. It’s not how I want to experience information…I think there are better solutions than a world mediated by screens. I don’t hate screens, but I don’t feel —and I don’t think any of us feel that good about how much time we spend slouched over them.Fortunately, the big tech companies seem to agree. They’re actually heavily invested in touch and speech and gesture, and also in senses — things that can turn dumb objects, like cups, and imbue them with the magic of the Internet, potentially turning this digital cloud into something we might touch and move, because reality is richer than screens».

To summarize, Humans like natural solutions. Humans love information. Humans need simple tools.These principles should underpin how we design for the future, not just for the Internet. You may feel uncomfortable about the age of information that we’re moving into. You may feel challenged, rather than simply excited. Guess what? Me too.

It’s a really extraordinary period of human history.
We are the people that actually build our world, there are no artificial intelligences… yet.
It’s us, designers, architects, artists, engineers. And if we challenge ourselves, I think that actually we can have a happy place filled with the information we love, that feels as natural and as simple as switching on lightbulb. And although it may seem inevitable, that what the public wants is watches and websites and widgets, maybe we could give a bit of thought to cork and light and hacky sacks.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

Valuable Skills of Multipotentialites & Steve Jobs


Did you ever think that you might have been better at something else? Do you have multiple interests? In Emilie Wapnick’s interesting TED Presentation about her many interests she makes a persuasive presentation about the value of having multiple interests. In this presentation, those with multiple interests are called Multipotentialites.

In a very convincing way she points out that being multipotentialite leads to the development of super powers. The specific super powers developed include:

  1. Idea Synthesis – the ability to synthesize multiple concepts and ideas from different areas
  2. Rapid Learning – as noted in previous posts, being able to learn fast is a sign of high intelligence (See here). Rapid learning becomes a super power because of how many times multipotentialites are beginners and endeavor to learn something new. These repeated learning experiences help multipotentialites become rapid learners as repeated exercises become habitual.
  3. Adaptability – ability to morph into what is needed because of the ability to take on different roles as needed for each endeavor. Of course new skills are needed for these roles and this enhances ones capacity and potential.

Interestingly, it is the 3 skills developed by multipotentialites that  can help us be successful in the 21st century thus validating pursuing and developing multiple interests and related skills. These skills are valuable because today we need innovators and creative thinkers to make tomorrow better. Being able to use idea synthesis, becoing a rapid learner and being adaptable means we can more quickly generate comprehensive improvements by creating interactions so everyone and everything benefits (which is the practice of paneugenesis).

I encourage you to watch her TED Presentation:

As I listened to EmilieWapnick’s presentation it kept reminding me of Steve Jobs amazing Stanford Commencement speech. In this speech he shared 3 stories, one was about the ability to connect the dots. He related this to when he went to Reed College and took a calligraphy class because he found it interesting, beautiful and amazing. He then related it to how that then later led to the Mac having multiple fonts and beautiful typography (which Windows and the whole computing world copied) highlighting the value of following his interest and being a multipotentialite.

After all, it was the ability of pulling together multiple interests that made the modern computing world and most advanced living ideas possible. Below is his Stanford presentation. If you have never seen it or even if you have I encourage you to watch it and share the overlap you see or don’t see. I look forward to hearing from you. Enjoy.

Original Source

Cleaning Plastic of the Oceans


Hey there everyone,

Almost exactly 1 year ago (June 3rd 2014) Boyan Slat – a 20-year-old Founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup (just 2 years younger than me, wow) – gave the long-awaited sequel to his 2012 TEDx Talk and announced that his organization will be deploying a world first by next year: the first system to safely remove plastic waste from oceans.
See also: THE OCEAN CLEANUP – What We Do

Taking care of the world’s ocean garbage problem is one of the largest environmental challenges mankind faces today. Not only will this first cleanup array contribute to cleaner waters and coasts but it simultaneously is an essential step towards our goal of cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” said Slat. “This deployment will enable us to study the system’s efficiency and durability over time.”

The structure he has designed will float, buffered along by the oceans’ currents, and snare plastics and other debris, which will then be picked up via a conveyor belt.

At over 2,000 meters (6,561 feet), this debris-trapping system will be the longest floating structure in the ocean. The Ocean Cleanup plans to deploy the floating structure off the coast of Japan in early 2016, where it will be in operation for at least two years.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

Original Source