Is College a Waste of Time and Money?


“The Power of No” author and podcaster James Altucher explains why college is no longer a good decision.

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5 Things You’d Learn If You Quit Facebook


I have Facebook, LinkedIn and WordPress. Only those, and I like them a lot.
I would too, but I can’t, it would be very difficult nowadays to catch up with all the info, messages, friends, family, contacts and with daily schedule/calendar without Facebook…

TIME

I have a Facebook problem.

The problem is, I love Facebook. I love posting about my day, connecting with friends near and far, and seeing the funny/crazy/sweet things people share. But I also hate Facebook, for being such a time suck, for making me feel bad about myself when other people’s lives seem so much more exciting than mine, and for leading me to spend more time interacting with a screen than with the real world. And when I log off Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are there clamoring for my attention, a never-ending scroll of links and tweets and photos and conversations that feels impossible to keep up with.

A few weeks ago, I’d had it. It seemed like social media was bringing me more guilt and frustration than happiness. So I decided to go on a fast, starting immediately. Here’s what I’ve learned:

Health.com:27 Mistakes Healthy People Make

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5 Secrets to Using Your Time Wisely


TIME

1) Schedule things that make you happy

You often schedule things that are “important”, but what about the things that make you happy? Activities on your calendar are more likely to be the things you do. So be as good about scheduling the personal as the professional.

From my interview with Stanford happiness researcher Jennifer Aaker:

…people who spend more time on projects that energize them and with people who energize them tend to be happier. However, what is interesting is that there is often a gap between where people say they want to spend their time and how they actually spend their time. For example, if you ask people to list the projects that energize (vs. deplete) them, and what people energize (vs. deplete them), and then monitor how they actually spend their time, you find a large percentage know what projects and people energize them, but do not…

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How Humans Spend Their Time Has Changed


Technopreneurph

How Humans Spend Their Time Has Changed image Hours of Work Per Week

Over the last 150 years, how humans spend their time has changed quite drastically.  As the chart above shows, the amount of time humans spend working has been on a steady decline over the last century and a half.  by In most countries, the typical work week has dropped by approximately 30 hours over the last 150 years.

On average, humans live 75 years.  That?s about 3,900 weeks. Or 27,000 days. Or 648,000 hours. We spend about a third of that time sleeping, and that number hasn?t changed over the last century.  What has changed drastically is how we spend our time when we are awake.

There are 168 hours in a week and we spend 56 hours of the week sleeping.  This leaves 112 hours for everything else.  If you go back 150 years, humans spent 70 hours of the 112 working.  However, how humans spend their time has…

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5 Ways to Deal With the End of Daylight Saving Time


See also: TIME explains: Daylight Saving Time (2 min. VIDEO)

How to make the transition to Standard Time as seamless as possible, with some silver linings to the time change:

1) Don’t change your routine on November 1
The night before the time change, just go to bed when you usually do. “Most people are already sleep deprived, so in all likelihood you could use the extra hour of sleep you’ll get”.

2) Use it as a sleep hygiene checkup
You can use the time change to diagnose your sleep habits. Before bedtime, set your clock back an hour (cell phones will be updated automatically at 2am), and keep your alarm set for your regular wake up time. “If you find yourself sleeping for the entire extra hour in the morning, that’s a sign you’re sleep deprived”.

3) After the time change, maximize your sun exposure…
Take advantage of the extra sunlight in the morning, which can give you a mood boost to start the day. If you tend to work out in the evenings, switch your routine to the morning.

4)and maybe boost your indoor light
If you’re still feeling draggy in the afternoon after a few days, consider investing in a light therapy box, which can counteract your brain’s inclination to start producing melatonin when the sun goes down.
“Blue light mimics sunlight and tells the brain to stop producing melatonin, the chemical that starts your brain’s sleep engine”.

5) And if you have kids…
The downside to falling back is that small children, already allergic to spending extra time in bed, may actually start waking up an hour earlier.
“Starting about a week or so before the time change, every two days put your kids to bed 15 minutes later, in a stair-stepping pattern”.

Best regards,
Pedro Calado

TIME

If you’ve been starting your day in near-total darkness each morning, relief is in sight: November 2 marks the end of Daylight Saving Time (in most of the country) and the day when your clocks “fall back” an hour. That means you’ll get a bonus hour of light in the morning, but lose an hour in the afternoon.

Although the prospect of leaving work when it’s dark out may be depressing, sleep specialist and clinical psychologist Michael Breus, PhD, reminds us to count our blessings. “Believe it or not, people have an easier time adjusting to this time change than to the one in March,” Breus says. “That’s because we gain an hour of sleep in the fall, but end up losing an hour when we ‘spring ahead.’”

Here, how to make the transition to Standard Time as seamless as possible, plus some silver linings to the time change.

Don’t…

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The Perfect Amount of Sleep, According to Science


TIME

This post originally appeared on Refinery29.com.

Wondering how much your sleep-in Saturdays or that one all-nighter will set you back? New research might help us gauge how to adjust our sleep schedules by shedding light on how many ZZZs we really need.

The study, published in the journal Sleep, used the data of 1,885 men and 1,875 women collected from the Finnish “Health 2000” survey. The sleep data included information about participants’ nightly quantity and quality of sleep, whether they had any sleep disorders, and how tired they were during the day. Additionally, the researchers used the Social Insurance Institution to gather information about how often those participants took sick days from work.

(MORE: 7 Sleep Gadgets That Actually Work)

Results showed that those who took the fewest sick days slept, on average, 7.6 hours (for women) and 7.8 hours (for men) per night. In…

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The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Center for Advanced Hindsight

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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How To Train Your Brain To Prefer Healthy Food


TIME

Which is more appealing: cheese pizza or salad? For many, the lure of lettuce hardly matches that of greasy comfort food, but new brain research from Tufts University published in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes suggests that reconditioning can train adults to prefer healthy food and shun the junk.

“We don’t start out in life loving French fries and hating, for example, whole wheat pasta,” said study co-author and Tufts University professor Susan B. Roberts in a press release. “This conditioning happens over time in response to eating – repeatedly! – what is out there in the toxic food environment.”

The researchers studied the brain scans of 13 people, then assigned eight of them to a new behavioral intervention geared toward weight loss. The program taught lessons on portion control and distributed menu plans geared around specific dietary targets, encouraging people to get 25% of their energy from protein and…

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The 3 Best Ways to Tackle Procrastination


TIME

Answer by John Chan, designer and founder of Dayboard, on Quora.

1) Write a daily to do list
Long to do lists don’t get done. They make us feel overwhelmed and even guilty if we know we’ve been putting them off.

So instead of staring at 30 or 40 items at a time, make your to do list super short but turning it into a daily to do list of 3-5 items.

Having only 3-5 items does a few mental tricks:

  1. It makes us prioritize based on what we feel we can accomplish in a day
  2. It’s much more likely to be achieved
  3. Makes us feel like we’re making a lot of progress every time we complete one item (you’re crossing off 20-33% of your list off at a time!)

2) Turn your to-do into a 2-minute task to get started
We often dread getting started on a…

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It’s Time for Storage to Smarten Up Already


Gigaom

DataGravity, the thus-far secretive startup co-founded by Paula Long of EqualLogic fame, is finally ready to talk about its DataGravity Discovery storage array.

Lately, much of the discussion around storage has been about speeds and feeds of the latest flash arrays — and that’s valid. But Long’s position is that much of the value of what companies store is lost because that data goes into a black box, and companies have to deploy audit software and other extras it to wring important information out of it. [company]DataGravity[/company] integrates those tools, search and analytics, into its software.

Aggregating data about the data

What are some examples of that important information? For instance: Who at the company accessed a file and how often? Who is working together on shared files? Is there personally identifiable information (PII) or credit card information sitting in documents? Which files have not been touched in two years? All of that…

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