How Our Photo Obsession is Threatening Our Memories


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Startup Quantifies Video Content With Code


Gigaom

Computer vision has seen some major advances over the past couple of years, and a New York-based startup called Dextro wants to take the field to a new level by making it easier to quantify what the computers are seeing. Founded in 2012 by a pair of Ivy League graduates, the company is building an object-recognition platform that it says excels on busy images and lets users query their videos using an API a la other unstructured datasets.

The idea behind Dextro, according to co-founder David Luan, is to evolve computer vision services beyond tagging and into something more useful. He characterizes the difference between Dextro and most other computer vision startups (MetaMind, AlchemyAPI and Clarifai, for example) in terms of categorization versus statistics. Tagging photos automatically is great for image search and bringing order to stockpiles of unlabeled pictures, “but we found that most of the value and most of the…

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In a Digital Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?


It is no longer enough to record seemingly every last moment of life with your smartphone, it seems. Near-death is fair game, too.

Thanks to the Personal Video IndustrialComplex tens of millions of video-enabled smartphones, feeding countless hours daily to video-sharing behemoths like YouTube rock concerts, presidential inaugurations, fourth-grade school plays and even midair near-disasters can all be considered “content” now, inspiring us all to tap our inner Edward R. Murrow and record the event for posterity.

But even as public gatherings, from the world-historical to the intimate, evolve into a sea of glowing blue screens, a backlash has started to take root. An improbable assortment of critics — mindfulness gurus, twee indie rockers, even, seemingly, Pope Francis — have started to implore these armchair videographers to drop their phones and actually start living again.

To live the moment or record the moment? It’s become a defining dilemma of the iPhone age.

I’ve read this article on The New York Times and it touches many aspects (very superficially I may add) of globalization, contemporary civil society, social, political, economic and value changes emerged by modernity.
It misses some aspects and doesn’t develop (many) others, this is my sociological perspective and rigor speaking, nevertheless it’s interesting.
Second: there’s no such thing as “iPhone Age” NY Times editors, there is an “digital age”, “information/knowledge age” and the “mobility age”, etc.
“Viral”, “audience”, “academics” and “paparazzis” concepts should be better defined and developed on the article, and please, PLEASE, don’t compare “celebrities” with “audience” and regular “people” and social agents, they stand on a field apart from the “regular joe”.

Original Source: A Defining Question in an iPhone Age: Live for the Moment or Record It?

Belgian Superstar Stromae Decodes The Visions Behind His Biggest and Eccentric Music Videos


TIME

What does it take to become one of Europe’s most sought-after artists? Perhaps a mega-single that topped the charts in more than 20 countries. And if that’s not enough, two number one albums, countless awards, a successful clothing line, viral YouTube videos, and a sold out U.S. tour might do the trick.

But Belgian singer and composer Stromae’s international success lies not just in his ability to write clever lyrics and produce catchy beats – his allure also rests on the utter strength of his music videos.

Stromae’s video offerings are laced with metaphors and treated with deep – and sometimes even uncomfortable – imagery. Take, for example, last year’s “Papaoutai,” a song about sons growing up to be just like their fathers. Stromae plays a father whose son wants to interact and do things that fathers and sons do. But Stromae’s character doesn’t move; he’s static…

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Video Of The Planet’s Most Terrifying (and Fictional) Traffic Crossroads


TIME

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Oh my giddy aunt! This is most dangerous traffic intersection in the world. Thank your lucky stars it’s not a real one. With cars whizzing in all directions in endless streams and pedestrians carelessly braving the crossings by threading their way between speeding vehicles, just looking at this video has raised our heartbeat.

Thankfully this intersection doesn’t actually it exist, it’s the work of genius film-maker and editor Fernando Livschitz. By threading together different clips of the same crossroads in Argentina, Livschitz has masterfully created Rush Hour: a video of the planet’s most terrifying (and most fictional) traffic phenomenon.

(via Fastcodesign)

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Biker Evading Robbery at Gunpoint Recorded by GoPro


What would you do…?

Biker Evades Robbery Attempt at Gunpoint, Captures It All on GoPro



Facebook Is Testing Snapchat Features


Facebook with Snapchat features. FaceSnap?

TIME

Wish that the status updates you want to share on Facebook weren’t so permanent? Soon, you may be able to make your posts on the social network vanish without a trace – after a set period of time of your choosing, of course. Similar to popular self-destructing message app SnapChat, your Facebook messages may soon have a limited lifespan of your choosing.

As reported by TheNextWeb, Facebook has begun rolling out these temporary status updates to a select group of users of its iOS smartphone app. Those who have access to the feature can select “expiration” times ranging from one hour to seven days. So if you want to talk about a TV episode, for example, you can have your discussion automatically disappear from your Timeline after it stops being relevant. That means less clutter and more focus on the more important events in your life that you have…

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A “Privacy Checkup” From Facebook


Gigaom

Facebook has rolled out its long-awaited privacy “checkup” button. The checkup is exactly what it sounds like — a way to quickly scan your activity on the site and see who can view your activity.

“We know you come to Facebook to connect with friends, not with us,” Product Manager Paddy Underwood said in the blog post announcing the news. “But we also know how important it is to be in control of what you share and who you share with.”

You’ll be prompted by Facebook’s privacy dinosaur — yes the same little guy who popped up back in May to let you know if your posts were public — to run your checkup. That means users less tuned into tech news won’t have to go hunting down the feature; Facebook will flag it for them.

Facebook's privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up. Facebook’s privacy dinosaur pops up to prompt you to take the check-up.

If you choose…

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Big Data and Statisticians, Revisited (Video)


What's The Big Data?

Data Science, Big Data and Statistics – can we all live together? from Chalmers Internal on Vimeo.

Terry Speed on how (and a bit on why) statisticians have been left out of the big data movement. Best slide comes at 34:20 and I wish Speed have talked more about how his “personal statistical paradigm” contrasts with the ideology of big data.

“This is the Golden Age of statistics–but not necessarily for statisticians”–Gerry Hahn

“Those who ignore statistics are condemned to re-invent it”–Brad Efron

HT: Nathan Yau

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