Why You Read 1000 Things About Change and Never Change


TIME

Knowing isn’t doing.

I post a lot of stuff about getting better at things. A common response to my posts is “I know that.”

Knowing is great for watching Jeopardy. It’s not nearly as good for life.

So why is learning about improvement so easy and actually improving so damn hard?

Most any change that requires a lot of consistent mental effort is going to fail because you spend most of the day on autopilot.

Via Charles Duhigg’s excellent book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business:

One paper published by a Duke University researcher in 2006 found that more than 40 percent of the actions people performed each day weren’t actual decisions, but habits.

Any change has to work when you’re on autopilot. The importance of self-control is one of the biggest myths about improvement.

Almost all the techniques for change…

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Why do we language?


neuroecology

Aeon has an article on how the genetics that contribute to language are actually part of a much larger system:

But over the years, it became clear that the truth about language origins was not quite as simple as a “language gene” or well-defined language module. Further study revealed that the FOXP2gene is relevant to multiple mental abilities and is not strictly a language gene at all. In a 2009 paper, for example, Max Planck Institute geneticist Wolfgang Enard exploited the fact that just three amino acids distinguish the human version of the FOXP2 protein from that of mice. When he engineered the FOXP2 genes of mice to produce proteins with the two human FOXP2 amino acids, it resulted in functional differences in brain areas critical for carrying out fine motor tasks and controlling muscle movements, as well as altered function in regions involved in sending and receiving reward…

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Why Losing Your Phone Is Worse Than Losing Your Wallet


Technopreneurph

There has been a recurring thought concerning mobile phone security that has been on my mind lately, and as I have been discussing it with clients, it is beginning to make me nervous to know that others out there may not be as aware.

It started with this article I read that discusses the lack of support from mobile phone carriers for a ?kill switch? for our smartphones in case they are stolen. Why? Cell phone thefts currently account for 30 to 40 percent of all robberies nationwide, and cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012 according to data from the Federal Communications Commission. Wireless carriers are generating a substantial amount of revenue through their insurance programs offered for smartphones. If our phones had a ?kill switch? (a means of completely disabling the phone), then there would be virtually no incentive for criminals to take them. As a result…

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Why Cutting Soda Calories Isn’t Such a Sweet Idea


TIME

Civil rights and soda might not seem like a classic combination. But yesterday, as major soda brands announced their goal to reduce beverage calories in the American diet, it seemed to make sense to Wendy Clark, president of sparkling brands and strategic marketing for Coca-Cola North America.

“‘The time is always right to do the right thing’ – MLK” she tweeted. “So proud of our industry.”

That time will come in 2025, the year by which every American will drink 20% fewer soda calories than they do today. In the press release about the announcement, which was made at the Clinton Global Initiative meeting in New York, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and Dr. Pepper Snapple vowed to make these reductions in part by making containers smaller, as well as focusing marketing efforts and innovation into lower-calorie drinks, no-calorie drinks and water. In the release, President Bill Clinton called the pledge a…

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